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Author Topic: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories  (Read 50527 times)

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Offline SS91

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Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
« on: September 03, 2007, 06:52:21 AM »
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  • Tale 1: Right and Might


    While a deer was eating wild fruit, he heard an owl call, "Haak, haak", and a cricket cry, "Wat", and, frightened, he fled. In his flight he ran through the trees up into the mountains and into streams. In one of the streams the deer stepped upon a small fish and crushed it almost to death. Then the fish complained to the court, and the deer, owl, cricket, and fish had a lawsuit. In the trial came out this evidence:

    As the deer fled, he ran into some dry grass, and the seed fell into the eye of a wild chicken, and the pain of the seed in the eye of the chicken caused it to fly up against a nest of red ants. Alarmed, the red ants flew out to do battle, and in their haste, bit a mongoose.

    The mongoose ran into a vine of wild fruit and shook several pieces of it on the head of a hermit who sat thinking under a tree. "Why did you, O fruit, fall on my head?" cried the hermit. The fruit answered: "We did not wish to fall; a mongoose ran against our vine and threw us down." And the hermit asked, "O mongoose, why did you throw the fruit?"

    The mongoose answered: "I did not wish to throw down the fruit, but the red ants bit me, and I ran against the vine." The hermit asked, "O ants, why did you bite the mongoose?" The red ants replied: "The hen flew against our nest and angered us."

    The hermit asked: "O hen, why did you fly against the red ants' nest?" And the hen replied: "The seed fell into my eyes and hurt me." And the hermit asked, "O seed, why did you fall into the hen's eyes?" And the seed replied: "The deer shook me down."

    The hermit said unto the deer, "O deer, why did you shake down the seed?" The deer answered: "I did not wish to do it, but the owl called, frightening me, and I ran." "O owl," asked the hermit, "why did you frighten the deer?" The owl replied: "I called, but as I am accustomed to call - the cricket, too, called."

    Having heard the evidence, the judge said, "The cricket must replace the crushed parts of the fish and make it well," as he, the cricket, had called and frightened the deer. The cricket WAS smaller and weaker than the owl or the deer, therefore had to bear the penalty.

    Jaisairam.

    AdminComments: This is a wonderful initiative. I was planning for it for a long time.
    « Last Edit: September 28, 2010, 08:57:05 AM by subhasrini »
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
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    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #1 on: September 16, 2007, 08:13:45 PM »
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  • The Man in the Moon
     
     
     
    There was a blacksmith once who complained: "I am not well, and my work is too warm. I want to be a stone on the mountain. There it must be cool, for the wind blows and the trees give a shade."

    A wise man who had power over all things replied: "Go you, be a stone." And he was a stone, high up on the mountain-side. It happened that a stone-cutter came that way for a stone, and when he saw the one that had been the blacksmith, he knew that it was what he sought, and he began to cut it.

    The stone cried out: "This hurts! I no longer want to be a stone. A stone-cutter I want to be. That would be pleasant." The wise man, humoring him, said, "Be a cutter." Thus he became a stone-cutter, and as he went seeking suitable stone, he grew tired, and his feet were sore. He whimpered, " I no longer want to cut stone. I would be the sun; that would be pleasant." The wise man commanded, " Be the sun." And he was the sun.

    But the sun was warmer than the blacksmith, than a stone, than a stone-cutter, and he complained, "I do not like this. I would be the moon. It looks cool." The wise man spake yet again, "Be the moon." And he was the moon.
    "This is warmer than being the sun," murmured he, "for the light from the sun shines on me ever. I do not want to be the moon. I would be a smith again. That, verily, is the best life." But the wise man replied, " I am weary of your changing. You wanted to be the moon; the moon you are, and it you will remain."

    And in yon high heaven lives he to this day.

    Jaisairam!!!


    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #2 on: September 18, 2007, 10:55:29 AM »
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  • The Legend of the Rice

    IN the days when the earth was young and all things were better than they now are, when men and women were stronger and of greater beauty, and the fruit of the trees was larger and sweeter than that which we now eat, rice, the food of the people, was of larger grain.

    One grain was all a man could eat; and in those early days, such, too, was the merit of the people, they never had to toil gathering the rice, for, when ripe, it fell from the stalks and rolled into the villages, even unto the granaries. And upon a year when the rice was larger and more plentiful than ever before, a widow said to her daughter "Our granaries are too small. We will pull them down and build larger." When the old granaries were pulled down and the new one not yet ready for use, the rice was ripe in the fields. Great haste was made, but the rice came rolling in where the work was going on, and the widow, angered, struck a grain and cried, "Could you not wait in the fields until we were ready? You should not bother us now when you are not wanted." The rice broke into thousands of pieces and said "From this time forth, we will wait in the fields until we are wanted," and from that time the rice has been of small grain, and the people of the earth must gather it into the granary from the fields.

    JaiSaiSaiRam!!!!!!!!!!!

    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
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    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #3 on: September 26, 2007, 07:14:08 PM »
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  • Lord Krishna and the Lapwing's Nest
       
     
       
     
    It was the battle of Kurukshetra. The white conch shells were about to sound, the elephants to march forward, and the attack of the archers to commence. The moment was brief and terrible. Banners were flying, and the charioteers preparing for the advance.

    Suddenly a little lapwing, who had built her nest in the turf of a hillock in the midst of the battlefield, drew the attention of the Lord Krishna by her cries of anxiety and distress for her young. "Poor little mother!" he said tenderly, "let this be thy protection!" And, lifting a great elephant-bell that had fallen near, he placed it over the lapwing's nest.

    And so, through the eighteen days of raging battle that followed, a lapwing and her nestlings were kept in safety in their nest, by the mercy of the lord, even in the midst of the raging field of Kurukshetra.

    JaiSaiSairam!!!!!!!!
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #4 on: October 04, 2007, 07:43:14 AM »
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  • The Peacock and the Tortoise
     
     
     
    Once upon a time a peacock and a tortoise became great friends. The peacock lived on a tree on the banks of the stream in which the tortoise had his home; and daily the peacock after he had a drink of water danced near the stream and displayed his gay plumage for the amusement of his friend.

    One unfortunate day, a bird-catcher who was on the prowl caught the peacock and was about taking him away to the market. The unhappy bird begged of his captor to allow him to bid his friend the tortoise good-bye, as it would be the last time he would see him.

    The bird-catcher allowed him his prayer and took him to the tortoise, who was greatly moved to see his friend a captive. The tortoise asked the bird-catcher to let the peacock go; but he laughed at the request, saying that was his means of livelihood.

    The tortoise then said, "If I make you a handsome present, will you let my friend go?" "Certainly," answered the bird-catcher, that is all I want." Whereupon the tortoise dived into the water and in a few seconds came up with a handsome pearl, which, to the great astonishment of the bird-catcher, he handed to him. This was beyond his expectations, and he let the peacock go immediately.

    A short time after, the avaricious man came back and told the tortoise that he thought he had not paid enough for the release of his friend, and threatened that, unless a match to that pearl was obtained for him, he would again catch the peacock. The tortoise, who had already advised his friend to betake himself to a distant jungle on being set free, was greatly enraged at the greed of this man.

    "Well," said the tortoise, "if you insist on having another pearl like it, give it to me and I will fish you out an exact match for it." The stupidity of the bird-catcher prevented his reasoning that "one in the hand was equal to two in the bed of the stream," and he speedily gave the pearl to the wily tortoise, who swam out with it saying, "I am no fool to take one and give two!" and forthwith disappeared, leaving the bird-catcher to be sorry ever after for his covetousness.


    JaiSaiSaiRam!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #5 on: October 06, 2007, 01:05:10 PM »
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  •  
    Let's See On Which Side The Camel Sits
       
     
       
     
     
    Once a greengrocer and a potter jointly hired a camel and each filled one side of the pannier with his goods. The camel as he went along the road took a mouthful every now and then, as he had a chance, from the greengrocer's bag of vegetables. This provoked a laugh from the potter, who thought he had the best of the bargain.

    But the time came for the camel to sit, and he naturally sat on the heavier side, bearing down on the pots, and also to have his mouth free to operate on the bag of greens. This caused the pots to break in the bag, and then the greengrocer had all the laugh to himself.


    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #6 on: October 06, 2007, 02:14:34 PM »
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  • Bond of Unity


    Once upon a time there lived a merchant.

    He had five sons who were his descendants.

    They asked their father for their own share Co's congestion of space they couldn't bare.

    The wise father laid a bet So that in future they don't regret.

    He asked his sons each stick to get.Which he would use for his bet.

    The father told his son, "Break these."
    And they broke each one with perfect ease.

    The father gathered the sticks from each And tied a bundle to make them teach

    The bundle of five was so strong.

    No one was able to break that bond .

    They tried and tried and tried again.

    It wasn't possible, it was a pain.

    This is a moral we must recall.

    United we stand divided we fall.


    Jaisairam!!!!!!!1
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #7 on: October 06, 2007, 02:19:42 PM »
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  • Compassion



    The Story of  The Good King Ranti Deva.

    There is a beautiful story, in one of the old books, about a great king who showed compassion to others. I will tell you that story. There was once a king called Ranti Deva. He was the son of Sankriti. He was known as the good King, for he always gave to the poor both money and food. 

    Sometimes he gave away all that he had, and he and his family used often to go without food so that they might feed the hungry.

    Once he, and those who were with him, had been without food for many days and they were very hungry. Some one brought them some food, some nice fresh milk, and ghi and barley and water. They were just going to sit down and take the food, when a Brahmana guest came in and asked for some, for he also was hungry. Ranti Deva was very pleased to give him food and served him first.

    When the Brahmana had eaten he went away, and then Ranti Deva divided what food remained so that all had equal portions. Just as he was going to eat his portion a Shudra came in and asked for some food. Ranti Deva gave him some, although he had not yet had any himself; so the Shudra had some food and he went away.

    There was not much left, but before Ranti Deva could take any, a man came in with a pack of dogs, and he also wanted food. The good King gave all that remained of the food to the man and the dogs, and all that was left was one cup of water.

    The man and the dogs also went away, and Ranti Deva was just going to take a drink of water, for he was very thirsty, and that was all that remained. Just at that moment a poor beggar came up and cried out " I am so thirsty, so thirsty, I pray you give me water". He was only an outcaste but he was tired and miserable. The kind and loving King took the cup of water that he was going to drink, and gave it to that poor beggar. While he was holding the cup so that the poor man could drink easily, Ranti Deva felt full of love and said: "I no longer feel the pain of hunger and thirst. All I ask of Hari is to let me bear the pain and sorrow of others, so that I may help them and take away their miseries".

    Ranti Deva shows us how we may be kind to all, how should help all, whether Brahmanas or Shudras, outcastes or

    beggars.

    We cannot give away all our food, as this good King Ranti Deva did, but we may often be able to give some to those

    who are hungry.

    Even little children can always do little deeds of love to those who are ill or in trouble.

    We must feel love for all, no matter whether they are of our own family or strangers, whether they are rich or poor,

    Brahmanas or outcastes.

    If any man needs our help, we should treat such a one as our brother.


    JaiSaiSaiRam!!!!!!!
    « Last Edit: October 07, 2007, 06:58:26 AM by subhasrini »
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #8 on: October 07, 2007, 07:02:09 AM »
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  • The Washerman and The Donkey  
       
     
     
    A story is told of an over-credulous washerman who was childless. This preyed upon his mind very much and was a permanent cause of unhappiness. One day, in the course of his work, he went to the house of the town kazi (or magistrate).

    He heard the kazi reproaching one of his pupils in this wise: "Not long ago you were a jackass; I made a man of you," etc. The washer-man did not wait to hear the rest. He hastened home with all speed and told his wife that he had made a discovery, which they were to lose no time in utilizing.

    "The kazi, my dear," said the washerman, "can make a man of a donkey. Why should we fret any longer for a child? Let us take our donkey to him and beg of him to transform him." The washerman and his wife, with their donkey, were shortly after this conversation on their way to the kazi.

    Their mission being explained with many supplications, the kazi, quick-sighted, and with an eye to business, accepted the charge, and promised to effect the metamorphosis in a year. The washerman on his part promised to give his services free for that period.

    A year passed in waiting and in happy hopes. On the appointed day the washerman and his companion presented themselves before the kazi. The kazi took them aside and pointed out a strong young man among his pupils. "There," he whispered to the washerman, "is your donkey. You see the change: now persuade him and take him home." The washerman and his wife flew to their newly created son, and with many endearing terms prepared to embrace him and made other affectionate advances.

    Amazed at this unaccountable conduct of these low people, the lad resisted at first, but as they persisted, he grew furious. After receiving many a cuff from the lad, a happy idea struck the washerman's wife: turning to her husband she said, "Go you and fetch his peg, rope, and grain-bag; perhaps they may remind him of what he was once."

    The washerman in hot haste went home and fetched them. But it seemed to make matters worse. The washerman held up each of these articles to the young man's view, and said, in the most persuasive tone he could command, "Come home, my son. Do you forget the day you were my donkey? This was the peg to which I would tether you, this your tether rope, and this your food-bag; come to your home!"

    By this time a jeering crowd had gathered round the young man, and this so infuriated him that he turned to and gave the washerman the soundest thrashing he had ever received in his life. The poor dupe of a washerman---the story says - went home thoroughly convinced that what fate had ordained it was useless to fight against, looking upon his punishment as a just return for his presumption.

    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #9 on: October 07, 2007, 12:18:53 PM »
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  • The Seven Weavers and The Field of Flax   
     
     
     
    Seven weavers once started on a moonlight journey. They had not gone very far from their home when they lost the road. After trying to find their way, they came to a field of flax, which they took to be a river, as the field was in flower, and they fancied the blue color of the flower to be that of water.

    They stripped themselves and began swimming. After hard labor, they got across. To make certain that no one was drowned, they took the precaution of counting themselves before resuming their journey; but they discovered that one of them was missing, as each forgot to count himself.

    Grieved at the loss of one of their company, they had not the heart to pursue their journey, but returned home.

    JaiSaiRam!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    « Last Edit: October 19, 2007, 03:56:26 AM by subhasrini »
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #10 on: October 28, 2007, 06:14:08 AM »
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  • The Four Wives



    There was a rich merchant who had 4 wives. He loved the 4th wife the most and adorned her with rich robes and treated her to delicacies. He took great care of her and gave her nothing but the best.

    He also loved the 3rd wife very much. He's very proud of her and always wanted to show off her to his friends. However, the merchant is always in great fear that she might run away with some other men.

    He too, loved his 2nd wife. She is a very considerate person, always patient and in fact is the merchant's confidante. Whenever the merchant faced some problems, he always turned to his 2nd wife and she would always help him out and tide him through difficult times.

    Now, the merchant's 1st wife is a very loyal partner and has made great contributions in maintaining his wealth and business as well as taking care of the household. However, the merchant did not love the first wife and although she loved him deeply, he hardly took notice of her.

    One day, the merchant fell ill. Before long, he knew that he was going to die soon. He thought of his luxurious life and told himself, "Now I have 4 wives with me. But when I die, I'll be alone. How lonely I'll be!"

    Thus, he asked the 4th wife, "I loved you most, endowed you with the finest clothing and showered great care over you. Now that I'm dying, will you follow me and keep me company?" "No way!" replied the 4th wife and she walked away without another word.

    The answer cut like a sharp knife right into the merchant's heart. The sad merchant then asked the 3rd wife, "I have loved you so much for all my life. Now that I'm dying, will you follow me and keep me company?" "No!" replied the 3rd wife. "Life is so good over here! I'm going to remarry when you die!" The merchant's heart sank and turned cold.

    He then asked the 2nd wife, "I always turned to you for help and you've always helped me out. Now I need your help again. When I die, will you follow me and keep me company?" "I'm sorry, I can't help you out this time!" replied the 2nd wife. "At the very most, I can only send you to your grave." The answer came like a bolt of thunder and the merchant was devastated.

    Then a voice called out : "I'll leave with you. I'll follow you no matter where you go." The merchant looked up and there was his first wife. She was so skinny, almost like she suffered from malnutrition. Greatly grieved, the merchant said, "I should have taken much better care of you while I could have !"

    Actually, we all have 4 wives in our lives

    a. The 4th wife is our body. No matter how much time and effort we lavish in making it look good, it'll leave us when we die.

    b. Our 3rd wife ? Our possessions, status and wealth. When we die, they all go to others.

    c. The 2nd wife is our family and friends. No matter how close they had been there for us when we're alive, the furthest they can stay by us is up to the grave.

    d. The 1st wife is in fact our soul, often neglected in our pursuit of material, wealth and sensual pleasure.

    Guess what?

    It is actually the only thing that follows us wherever we go. Perhaps it's a good idea to cultivate and strengthen it now rather than to wait until we're on our deathbed to lament .

    JaiSaiRam!!!!!!!!!!!!

    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #11 on: October 29, 2007, 06:13:29 PM »
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  • Sand and Stone


    A story tells that two friends were walking through the desert. During some point of the journey they had an argument, and one friend slapped the other one in the face. The one who got slapped was hurt, but without saying anything, wrote in the sand: "TODAY MY BEST FRIEND SLAPPED ME IN THE FACE."

    They kept on walking until they found an oasis, where they decided to take a bath. The one, who had been slapped, got stuck in the mire and started drowning, but the friend saved him. After the friend recovered from the near drowning, he wrote on a stone: "TODAY MY BEST FRIEND SAVED MY LIFE."

    The friend who had slapped and saved his best friend asked him, "After I hurt you, you wrote in the sand and now, you write on a stone, why?"

    The other friend replied: "When someone hurts us, we should write it down in sand where winds of forgiveness can erase it away. But, when someone does something good for us, we must engrave it in stone where no wind can ever erase it."

    LEARN TO WRITE YOUR HURTS IN THE SAND, AND TO CARVE YOUR BENEFITS IN STONE
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #12 on: October 30, 2007, 05:50:54 PM »
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  • Two Frogs



    A group of frogs were traveling through the woods, and two of them fell into a deep pit. When the other frogs saw how deep the pit was, they told the two frogs that they were as good as dead. The two frogs ignored the comments and tried to jump up out of the pit with all their might. The other frogs kept telling them to stop, that they were as good as dead. Finally, one of the frogs took heed to what the other frogs were saying and gave up. He fell down and died.

    The other frog continued to jump as hard as he could. Once again, the crowd of frogs yelled at him to stop the pain and just die. He jumped even harder and finally made it out. When he got out, the other frogs said, "Did you not hear us?" The frog explained to them that he was deaf. He thought they were encouraging him the entire time.

    This story teaches two lessons:

    1. There is power of life and death in the tongue. An encouraging word to someone who is down can lift them up and help them make it through the day.

    2. A destructive word to someone who is down can be what it takes to kill them.

    Be careful of what you say. Speak life to those who cross your path. The power of words... it is sometimes hard to understand that an encouraging word can go such a long way. Anyone can speak words that tend to rob another of the spirit to continue in difficult times. Special is the individual who will take the time to encourage another.

    JaiSaiRam.

    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
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    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India
    « Reply #13 on: November 01, 2007, 05:36:19 AM »
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  • UTTANKA




    There was once a great sage named Gautama. Many disciples came to the sage in the pursuit of knowledge. Among them was Uttanka, who was exemplary in his devotion to Gautama.

    Uttanka did the household work for Gautama, helped him prepare for the sacrificial rites and knew exactly what his guru (teacher) needed at the right time. His knowledge of the Vedas was outstanding and the other disciples went to him for tutoring.

    Gautama had never had such a sincere and intelligent student before. There was once a great sage named Gautama. Many disciples came to the sage in the pursuit of knowledge. Among them was Uttanka, who was exemplary in his devotion to Gautama.

    Uttanka did the household work for Gautama, helped him prepare for the sacrificial rites and knew exactly what his guru (teacher) needed at the right time. His knowledge of the Vedas was outstanding and the other disciples went to him for tutoring. Gautama had never had such a sincere and intelligent student before.

    Uttanka and his classmates graduated. All his classmates left the hermitage (ashram) but the guru loved Uttanka dearly and did not permit him to go. Year after year new students came, they graduated and left the hermitage in their independent search for knowledge but Uttanka stayed back as he was hesitant to hurt his guru.

    As years passed by, Uttanka became old. He was unable to carry the load of firewood, his back ached and his hair began to turn white. One day when he was unable to do the household chores due to his declining strength. He came to his guru Gautama in frustration and poured his heart out.


    “Gurudeva, you did not allow me to leave the ashram for all these years. Now, I am old and unable to take care of your household chores. I am unhappy that I could not enjoy worldly pleasures as other disciples did.”

    Gautama replied, “My son, I kept you here because of my love for you. But if you wish to go, you have my permission and my blessings. With the power of your penance in serving me, you will become a young man again and I shall give my daughter to you in marriage.”

    Immediately, Uttanka regained the looks and strength of a young man. He was very grateful to his guru. He married Gautama's daughter and was ready to lead his independent life.

    Before his departure Uttanka wanted to pay tribute (gurudakshina) to Gautama. The sage said, "You have served me with devotion for all these years. No other tribute is necessary.” Then Uttanka went to Gautama's wife and requested her to ask for something that she had wanted all her life.

    After repeated coaxing, Gautama's wife said, “Uttanka, if you insist, I want the earrings worn by king Saudasa’s wife. I have heard so much about these earrings that I yearn for them in my dreams.”

    Uttanka promised to get the earrings. He knew that it was not an easy task and he would face many dangers. So, he asked his bride to stay with her parents while he set out in search of the earrings. Uttanka was confident that his sincere penance to his guru would help him in his challenging, forthcoming task.

    When sage Gautama heard that Uttanka has left on a dangerous endeavor, he was concerned. He told his wife, “You should have not asked for the earrings, my dear. Uttanka will face many dangers that may even threaten his life.” Gautama's wife regretted her request, but it was too late. Uttanka had already left on his quest, eager for success.

    King Saudasa was living in a remote forest. He had annoyed Vasistha, and was cursed by the sage to lead the life of a cannibal.

    Uttanka trudged on until he came to Saudasa’s abode. As soon as Saudasa saw Uttanka he attacked him. Uttanka stopped him by saying, “Oh king, wait! I have come on an errand for my guru. It is against Dharma (righteousness) to injure someone who is on such mission. I promise that I will offer myself to you after I have completed my errand.”

    Saudasa inquired what the errand was about.

    “I have come to beg for your wife’s earrings.” Saudasa was taken aback. He admired the courage of Uttanka, in approaching him, a cannibal. He said, “Go to my wife and tell her that I would like her to give the earrings to you. This good act may reduce my life of suffering as a cannibal.”

    Uttanka went to the queen with Saudasa's message. The queen immediately parted with her earrings with the hope that her husband would benefit by her good deed.

    When Uttanka examined the earrings, he could not find anything special with them. Out of curiosity, he asked, “What is special about these earrings?”

    The queen said, “This is a celestial ornament. The wearer will be free from hunger and thirst and will be protected from all dangers.”

    The queen further warned, “The nagas (serpents) have coveted these earrings for a long time and will steal them at their first opportunity. So, guard them well. Hide them in the folds of your deerskin and never part with them.”

    Uttanka thanked the queen and assured her, “I shall protect them with my life.” Then he left and came back to Saudasa as he had promised. He requested the cannibal to spare him until he had handed over the earrings to his guru's wife. Saudasa agreed.

    Uttanka then added, “You helped me in getting the earrings and in fulfilling my promise to my guru’s wife. Your good deed will reduce the tenure of your life as a cannibal. Hence, I have also been of help to you. By helping each other, we have become friends. The scriptures say that one should not eat the flesh of a friend. So you would surely not like to eat me…..?”

    Saudasa was struck by Uttanka’s logic, and could not disagree with him. There was even the possibility of leading a normal life soon! Uttanka quickly departed before Saudasa changed his mind.

    On way to Gautama's hermitage, Uttanka felt tired. So he tied the deerskin, which was encasing the earrings, on the branch of a tree and lay down to rest in its shade. Unfortunately, the deerskin slipped off and fell on the ground. A naga was waiting for this opportunity. It quickly picked up the earrings and sneaked away. Uttanka saw the naga slipping away with the earrings and chased it. The naga disappeared into an anthill. Uttanka started digging the anthill with his staff. He continued to dig for several days without food or water. He was determined to give up his life in the search of the earrings rather than return to his guru's hermitage empty handed.

    An old man suddenly arrived on the scene and asked “What are you doing, young man?”

    Uttanka explained, “A naga stole the celestial earring that I was carrying for my guru's wife and went into this anthill. I am trying to find the naga.”

    The old man said, “You must be joking! The naga may be hidden thousands of miles deep into the soil. It may take you your entire life to dig with your staff which can hardly make a dent in this hard soil.”

    “I prefer to die here rather than face my guru's wife without fulfilling her wishes. I am so very ashamed”, said Uttanka, sorrowfully.

    The old man was none other than Indra, king of the devas (gods). Appreciating the determination of Uttanka, Indra assumed his real form and asked Uttanka to strike his staff onto his bajra (the thunder weapon that Indra carries). Uttanka did as he was told and his staff was energized. The invigorated staff accelerated the process of digging into the anthill.

    Uttanka soon tunneled into the kingdom of Nagas (serpants). It was huge and well protected by the nagas. Uttanka was puzzled. “How can I search this place and where can I look for the naga who stole my earrings?”

    Suddenly he saw a horse standing before him with blazing fire around him. Uttanka, overcome by awe, did not move. The horse spoke, “Do not be afraid, Uttanka. I am Agni (god of fire). You have served me well at your guru's hermitage. I am very pleased with you. Blow at me hard and I will emit smoke that will choke the nagas. They will come to you for rescue. Then, you can ask the naga king to return the earrings.”

    Uttanka did as he was told and in no time the entire naga kingdom was filled with smoke. The nagas could not breathe and they were all forced to come out of their homes. They bowed before Uttanka. Uttanka asked the nagas to return the earrings. The nagas realized that they had to choose between their lives and the earrings. And of course, they chose to save their lives and quickly returned the earrings!

    Uttanka returned to Gautama’s ashrama and gave the earrings to Gautama’s wife. Everyone was very happy at Uttanka’s safe return. Gautama and his wife showered their blessings on Uttanka. Uttanka fulfilled his obligation of giving gurudakshina and was finally free to lead his own life.


    JaiSaiRam.


       


    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Moral Stories
    « Reply #14 on: November 08, 2007, 10:49:15 AM »
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  • Importance of keeping one’s word

    We all know that the pandavas left their kingdom for 13 long years for keeping up their word! Well, for Arjuna going away from the bhogas of a king, for the sake of truth, was not new. He did it once well before the aranyavaas. The story goes like this:

    The kalyaanam of pandavas with Draupadi was an unusual one. However, it was perfectly according to dharma shastras. Infact Draupadi is one of the greatest pativratas and praised even by Lord Krishna for her Dharma vartana. A few reasons to justify the kalyaanam:

    Kunti Devi, the mother of pandavas, who never knew what a lie was, gave her will.
    Vyaasa Maharshi, one of the avataar of Lord Vishnu, ordered the kalyaanam to be done.
    Lord Shiva, pleased with her tapas, gave a boon to Draupadi to marry the pandavas.
    Pandavas, though were five physically, were all amshas of Indra, the King of the Gods. Hence, pandavas were actually one.

    Naarada, again an avataar of Lord Vishnu, suggested some rules to be followed by pandavas and Draupadi for living together. This is because, though they were amshas of Gods and Godesses, since they had a human form some addition rules according to dharma shastras needed to be followed. One of the rules was that: Draupadi should spend one year with each of the pandavas and while she was with one of them, no other pandavas should visit the palace where they might be.

    In case of any breach of their rule, one-year pilgrimage was prescribed by way of penance leaving the kingdom.The pandavas and Draupadi were living happily until one day: a brahmana came running to Arjuna saying that the thieves had stolen his cows.

    Arjuna wanted to rush with him to catch the thieves but he realised that his bow and arrows were kept in Yudhisthira's palace and he was there in the company of Draupadi. He hesitated for a while, then seeing brahmana's plight he rushed in to Yudhisthira 's palace took his bow and arrows and ran to catch the thieves. After he caught the thieves and punished them, after restoring the cows of the brahmana, Arjuna came back to Yudhisthira and told him about his transgression of the rule.

    Yudhisthira, knowing the reason of the breach of their rule, said their is no need for Arjuna to take the pilgrimage. Since it is a mistake committed towards him, and that too for a good reason, he will pardon arjuna . However, Arjuna would never break his word. He immediately set out for a one-year pilgrimage. May be this is why Arjuna is such a favourite sakha of Lord Krishna.

    Morals in the Story:

    The story shows how important it is to keep up ones word, whether it is of any consequence or not, how much ever difficult it is.

    Arjuna, knowing that he will be punished for breaching the rule, did not stop doing his duty as a king to protect his people and punish the theif. Thus, one must always perform his duty without any laziness or any kind of fear.

    Rewards for such people do show up as immediate difficulties, but in the end - it is truth is what always wins (Satyameva jayate). Arjuna's win was in the way of gaining eternal friendship with the Lord.

    Message:

    Imagine if everyone keeps his word and always speaks truth —

    will we have corruption?

    will we have poverty?

    Though its a very difficult to inculcate, unless we are truthful there will be no development.

    Like Arjuna if everyone does they duty — will there be such slow development for such a large community of intelligent people?

    Temporal gains got by saying lies never will be permanent. They will not only bring us down on a long run in life, leave aside winning the heart of the God.

    JaiSaiRam.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

     


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