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Offline SS91

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The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
« on: February 01, 2013, 08:27:57 AM »
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  • The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
     
     The superb Sanskrit text, The Bhagavad Gita, is an amazing guide and in my view the ultimate “user's manual” for the human adventure. This ancient text is a dialogue between two mighty heroes: Krishna and Arjuna. Krishna represents the God within us all who is always waiting patiently to guide us - if we can listen. Arjuna is the greatest warrior of the time and Krishna is his charioteer in the battle of life. He will steer Arjuna through, if Arjuna hears and understands.
     
    The entire dialogue takes place the middle of a battlefield where Krishna and his best friend Arjuna are getting ready to fight a monumental battle between the two opposing sides of the same family. Arjuna has lost his courage and cannot accept the thought that he must kill members of his own family and friends in this terrible bloody war. He has thrown down his weapons and is sitting depressed and dejected in the bottom of his chariot.
     
    The Sanskrit word Shanti means peace, but what is Krishna saying in the Bhagavad Gita when he uses this word Shanti? Are there not many wars going on within us all, wars raging in our own hearts and minds? These inner wars cloud our thoughts, consume our energies and make us stupid.
     
    Krishna tells his good friend Arjuna that no man can know happiness without peace (II.66). In fact the sequence of our compulsions is quite predictable. We start thinking about a particular thing and from those thoughts, we want it. If our desire for the thing is frustrated, we become angry. Once we are angry, our ability to reason and think clearly is skewed.
     
    From this anger rises delusion. We tell ourselves all kinds of absurd things. We deserve that thing and we will do anything to get it, no matter what the consequences, no matter what our actions might do to our soul. We forget that perhaps the thing is not ours to have, or that we don’t deserve it; or that it may not be the right time for us to have such a thing, it might bring us harm.
     
    Thus from anger arises delusion, and from delusion loss of memory - what we call denial - and from loss of memory we begin to lose conscious awareness of and contact with our own spirit. Krishna calls this the ‘death of the spirit’ which leads to real death.
     
    Uncontrolled desire leads to death. Krishna points out the wiser way. Instead of allowing our desires to devour our peace of mind, the man of wisdom develops an evenness, a subtle intelligent detachment and disinterest in the objects of the senses. These objects are thrown at us 24/7 on our television screens. We are told we can only be happy when we have this car, or that cell phone and the latest techno-gadgets. We must be thin and young, we must endlessly consume products that will make us happy winners.
     
    By the time we are in our 30’s most of us know that none of these things have made us happy. In fact we tire of them very quickly and must have more, more, more. Ah, the next thing we desire will finally bring us that elusive happiness we have been chasing. But it never happens.
     
    Lasting happiness is not to be found in the external world. Temporal experiences of joy and suffering are in abundance, but real lasting peace and understanding are only found within. When Time makes us wise and weary of being fools, we turn within and begin to question everything.
     
    We begin to understand how our unruly desires have run us, controlled us, made us act compulsively, and left us even emptier than before. We begin to observe this process. We see how our five senses have drawn us into this delusion and we consider the idea of practicing an enlightened control.
     
    The continued practice of observing the reactions of the senses and controlling our own thoughts in the mind will inevitably lead us to inner peace. This is ‘the peace that surpasses all understanding’ (Philippians 4:7) and this Peace is our Home, the Source of our Real Self and the entire universe.
     
    This is the Shanti that Krishna speaks of in the Bhagavad Gita. For as Krishna says, the mind that allows the senses to carry off his or her capacity for insight - literally looking within - is as helpless as a ship caught in a storm at sea.
     
    Krishna teaches Arjuna how to act wisely and gives him the knowledge he needs to understand his place in the universe. Krishna tells Arjuna that whoever has purified his mind in the fires of Knowledge and mastered his senses will obtain this Peace (IV.39).
     
    ***
     
    The five senses make their contact with the external world and its objects, and send their information-impulses to our brain, allowing us to experience the polarities of pleasure and pain, sukha-duhkha in Sanskrit. These experiences are impermanent and are to be endured, for what is temporal has no ‘real’ existence and is unreal (Asat) in the sense that it is fluctuation and change (Bhagavad Gita II.14-16). While the real (Sat) always exists, as the 14th century Sufi poet Mahmud Shabistari says, ‘beneath the curtain of each atom.’
     
    It is not that the external world has no value as some believe. However, its state of constant change makes it the unreal (Asat) in the sense that it is impermanent. The external reality is very real to the five senses, but there is so much more to our world than what we can see, hear, touch, etc. Everywhere there is the imperishable (akshara) that permeates, supports and sustains the temporal illusory hologram.
     
    Without Knowledge of this eternal, immutable, imperishable Real - we are lost, floating on a sea of delusion and ignorance that tosses us around at whim and fools us into thinking that possessions and pleasure can give us meaning.
     
    Krishna teaches his friend that this universe is pervaded by that which is indestructible and Arjuna has no power to kill that. The body may die, but the soul (Atma) never dies. It simply transmigrates to a new body, just as we get new clothes when our old ones are worn out. (II.17-22)
     
    When our body is worn out we move into new forms that resonate with our thoughts, new data-collecting vehicles to expand our expression of the God within us all. The realization that you never die changes your entire attitude towards living and you have the opportunity to become less attached to the perils, failures, and successes of your current identity self.
     
    There comes a time when in wisdom you will not care if you have been immortalized by the media. Your search for meaning will not be based on the approval or disapproval of others. You will care more about doing what is right, taking action with the greatest integrity and knowledge you have available to you in that moment, and that knowledge will always be changing as you continually reevaluate its worth.
     
    You will ask yourself, not so much, what did I accomplish - but rather what consciousness was I in when I acted. When that time comes you will have Wisdom, you will have imperishable Peace.
     

     Courtesy: V.Susan Ferguson
     

     
    « Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 10:57:06 AM by SS91 »
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #1 on: February 01, 2013, 11:37:32 AM »
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  • Bathing in the Bhagavad-Gita

    An old farmer and his grandson lived on a farm. One day the grandson said, “I try to read the Bhagavad-Gita just like you but I don’t understand it much. And whatever little I understand, I forget it very soon. What is the use of reading this book?”

    The old farmer quietly turned from putting coal in the stove and said, “Take this coal basket down to the river and bring me back a basket of water.”

    The young boy did as he was told, but all the water leaked out before he got back home. The farmer asked him to try again, and again. But every single time, the water leaked out of the basket before he got back to the house. Finally, he said exhausted, “See Grandpa, it’s useless!”

    “So you think it’s useless?” the old farmer said, “Look at the basket.” The boy looked at the basket and for the first time realized that the basket had been transformed from a dirty old coal basket to a new clean one, inside and out.

    “Son, that’s what happens when you read a book like the Bhagavad-Gita. You might not understand or remember everything, but when you read it again and again, you will realize the benefit one day.”



    MAIN   THEMES   OF  THE   BHAGAVAD  GITA                

     
    I   INTRODUCTION
     
    Bhagavad Gita or  in  other words song of Bhagavan  is  an  episode  in India’s  Great Epic, the Mahabharata.  The main story of  Mahabharata is the war between two branches of the Kaurava  family led by  Duryodhana on  one  side and Yudhishthira on the other  side  Krishna who was God  incarnated volunteered to act as Arjuna’s  charioteer.  But Arjuna refuses to fight.  This is the starting-point of the Bhagavad Gita is to persuade Arjuna to fight. True, throughout the poem this has never been lost sight  of; but the bulk of the poem is not concerned with  the  respective merits of war and peace, but with  deepest thing of man and  God.
     
    II  THE MAIN TEACHING OF BHAGAVAD GITA
     
    1.  A T H M A
     
    The individual self : The first topic that Krishna broaches in his dialogue with Arjuna is the nature of the embodied self.  The self is eternal, indestructible, cannot kill or be killed, is not born and does not die, roves every where, yet  is  always firm and unmoved; it is un-manifest, unthinkable, immutable. This is Krishna’s argument as to why  Arjuna should not be depressed about  killing his cousins. It is not his real self that kills nor does he kill their real selves (2:18-25; 3:27-29,  etc.)
     
    2.  Y O G A
     
    The word yoga is used in a vast number of  senses  in  the Bhagavad  Gita. The root meaning is the same as for the English word ‘yoke’ which refers to  ‘contain’ or ‘control.’  After in Gita  ‘yoga’ merely means ‘method’ necessary for control of mind and senses. So that soul or self, can be kept steadily concentrated on the ultimate object, and realises its true nature. Thus the soul is set free from its entanglement with nature. When properly concentrated in this way, the person is without desire for attachment, which is the cause of sins. The person who is unaffected by the opposites of pleasure and difficulty, by cold or heat etc. is regarded as sinless.
     
    3. K A R M A (works, Action)
     
    Even though it is karma (action) that binds soul to cosmic existence and  re-birth, work is essential in the world.  God himself engages in work, otherwise the worlds would cease to exist.
     


    i) Sva-Dharma: Bhagavad Gita says it is better to perform  one’s  duty (Sva-Dharma) than to do another’s  duty well. You do that to which you are born. This is a very conservative teaching of Bhagavad Gita.
     
    ii) Sacrifice: The Vedic sacrifices to the gods were designed to bring their own reward. Man sustains the Gods so that they may sustain him in return. In a very special sense the sacrifice is Brahman. The whole of life is to be a kind of sacrifice to the Lord, for he is both the cause of the sacrifice and the essential power within the sacrifice.
     
     
    What is required is performance of duty with desire for benefits  thereby (nis-kama-karma) yoga helps to achieve this disinterest and dis-attachment. But more important is focusing the mind on the supreme Lord.

     
    4. T R I G U N A S
     
    Every man is powerless and made to  work by  the constituents born of nature.  These are the three constituents of Nature namely Sattva, Rajas, and Tames: goodness or purity; passion or energy; darkness or dullness.  The different types of people and the action done by them in society are divided by these qualities. Krishna says: ‘Know too that all these states of being proceed from me but I am not in them, they are in me.’
     

     
    5. B R A H M A N    
     
    There are a few passages in Bhagavad Gita  where  the soul is ultimate  and  would appear to be the realisation of oneness with an impersonal Brahman. But the context usually indicates that this is to lead on from the state of isolation, or withdrawal (Kaivalya) from the sense of attachment, through the sense of oneness with the impersonal, to eventual relationship with the supreme person.  It is said that the self must know Brahman, stand stilled in Brahman, even become Brahman.  Brahman Jnana is the ultimate goal.
     
    6.  C R E A T I O N: God is said to be creator of all, being both material and efficient cause.  He contains prakrti, with its changing states, within himself. But the Lord’s nature does not change along with the changes of nature. Creation is said to occur again and again. But the supreme person transcends all this, while containing it within his being.
     

    7.  A V A T A R A: The Lord’s Avataras are also recurring, whenever there is loss of Dharma the Lord takes up the from of  some  created  being, and discards to earth to restore righteousness, destroy evil-does, and save  his devotees (the good). When Arjuna asks to see Krishna’ true, glorious from, he is granted the splendid vision described in all ch.11 Arjuna sees the whole of creation, even all Gods within this glorious  form  (Visva-rupa- darsana).
     
    8.  B H A K T I: (Divine love or prasada-grace) following this vision, it is clear that dependence upon the Lord’s grace is offered as most important means of release. Thus in the final word Krishna tells Arjuna to give up all his dharmas to take him as his sole refuge (sarama) and then he will be set free from all papa(sin). This Bhakti is the ultimate path to mukti according to the Gita.

    « Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 10:57:52 AM by SS91 »
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #2 on: February 02, 2013, 01:01:44 PM »
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  • Chapter 1: Observing the Armies on the Battlefield of Kurukṣetra


    Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.1

    dhṛtarāṣṭra uvāca

    dharma-kṣetre kuru-kṣetre

    samavetā yuyutsavaḥ

    māmakāḥ pāṇḍavāś caiva

    kim akurvata sañjaya

    SYNONYMS

    dhṛtarāṣṭraḥ uvāca — King Dhṛtarāṣṭra said; dharma-kṣetre — in the place of pilgrimage; kuru-kṣetre — in the place named Kurukṣetra; samavetāḥ — assembled; yuyutsavaḥ — desiring to fight; māmakāḥ — my party (sons); pāṇḍavāḥ — the sons of Pāṇḍu; ca — and; eva — certainly; kim — what; akurvata — did they do; sañjaya — O Sañjaya.

    TRANSLATION

    Dhṛtarāṣṭra said: O Sañjaya, after my sons and the sons of Pāṇḍu assembled in the place of pilgrimage at Kurukṣetra, desiring to fight, what did they do?

    PURPORT

    Bhagavad-gītā is the widely read theistic science summarized in the Gītā-māhātmya (Glorification of the Gītā). There it says that one should read Bhagavad-gītā very scrutinizingly with the help of a person who is a devotee of Śrī Kṛṣṇa and try to understand it without personally motivated interpretations. The example of clear understanding is there in the Bhagavad-gītā itself, in the way the teaching is understood by Arjuna, who heard the Gītā directly from the Lord. If someone is fortunate enough to understand Bhagavad-gītā in that line of disciplic succession, without motivated interpretation, then he surpasses all studies of Vedic wisdom, and all scriptures of the world. One will find in the Bhagavad-gītā all that is contained in other scriptures, but the reader will also find things which are not to be found elsewhere. That is the specific standard of the Gītā. It is the perfect theistic science because it is directly spoken by the Supreme Personality of Godhead, Lord Śrī Kṛṣṇa.

    The topics discussed by Dhṛtarāṣṭra and Sañjaya, as described in the Mahābhārata, form the basic principle for this great philosophy. It is understood that this philosophy evolved on the Battlefield of Kurukṣetra, which is a sacred place of pilgrimage from the immemorial time of the Vedic age. It was spoken by the Lord when He was present personally on this planet for the guidance of mankind.

    The word dharma-kṣetra (a place where religious rituals are performed) is significant because, on the Battlefield of Kurukṣetra, the Supreme Personality of Godhead was present on the side of Arjuna. Dhṛtarāṣṭra, the father of the Kurus, was highly doubtful about the possibility of his sons' ultimate victory. In his doubt, he inquired from his secretary Sañjaya, "What did they do?" He was confident that both his sons and the sons of his younger brother Pāṇḍu were assembled in that Field of Kurukṣetra for a determined engagement of the war. Still, his inquiry is significant. He did not want a compromise between the cousins and brothers, and he wanted to be sure of the fate of his sons on the battlefield. Because the battle was arranged to be fought at Kurukṣetra, which is mentioned elsewhere in the Vedas as a place of worship — even for the denizens of heaven — Dhṛtarāṣṭra became very fearful about the influence of the holy place on the outcome of the battle. He knew very well that this would influence Arjuna and the sons of Pāṇḍu favorably, because by nature they were all virtuous. Sañjaya was a student of Vyāsa, and therefore, by the mercy of Vyāsa, Sañjaya was able to envision the Battlefield of Kurukṣetra even while he was in the room of Dhṛtarāṣṭra. And so, Dhṛtarāṣṭra asked him about the situation on the battlefield.

    Both the Pāṇḍavas and the sons of Dhṛtarāṣṭra belong to the same family, but Dhṛtarāṣṭra's mind is disclosed herein. He deliberately claimed only his sons as Kurus, and he separated the sons of Pāṇḍu from the family heritage. One can thus understand the specific position of Dhṛtarāṣṭra in his relationship with his nephews, the sons of Pāṇḍu. As in the paddy field the unnecessary plants are taken out, so it is expected from the very beginning of these topics that in the religious field of Kurukṣetra, where the father of religion, Śrī Kṛṣṇa, was present, the unwanted plants like Dhṛtarāṣṭra's son Duryodhana and others would be wiped out and the thoroughly religious persons, headed by Yudhiṣṭhira, would be established by the Lord. This is the significance of the words dharma-kṣetre and kuru-kṣetre, apart from their historical and Vedic importance.
    « Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 10:58:14 AM by SS91 »
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline Sairamsai

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #3 on: February 02, 2013, 03:00:03 PM »
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  • May I ask you, there are so many schools of thought now which translate Bhagvat Gita. So which one do you follow or what is the source...

    Wonderful job I will be a constant reader of this post....

    Thanks from the bottom of my heart to you...

    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #4 on: February 03, 2013, 12:01:43 PM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.2

    sañjaya uvāca

    dṛṣṭvā tu pāṇḍavānīkaḿ

    vyūḍhaḿ duryodhanas tadā

    ācāryam upasańgamya

    rājā vacanam abravīt


    SYNONYMS

    sañjayaḥ uvāca — Sañjaya said; dṛṣṭvā — after seeing; tu — but; pāṇḍava-anīkam — the soldiers of the Pāṇḍavas; vyūḍham — arranged in a military phalanx; duryodhanaḥ — King Duryodhana; tadā — at that time; ācāryam — the teacher; upasańgamya — approaching; rājā — the king; vacanam — words; abravīt — spoke.

    TRANSLATION

    Sañjaya said: O King, after looking over the army arranged in military formation by the sons of Pāṇḍu, King Duryodhana went to his teacher and spoke the following words.

    PURPORT

    Dhṛtarāṣṭra was blind from birth. Unfortunately, he was also bereft of spiritual vision. He knew very well that his sons were equally blind in the matter of religion, and he was sure that they could never reach an understanding with the Pāṇḍavas, who were all pious since birth. Still he was doubtful about the influence of the place of pilgrimage, and Sañjaya could understand his motive in asking about the situation on the battlefield. Sañjaya wanted, therefore, to encourage the despondent king and thus assured him that his sons were not going to make any sort of compromise under the influence of the holy place. Sañjaya therefore informed the king that his son, Duryodhana, after seeing the military force of the Pāṇḍavas, at once went to the commander in chief, Droṇācārya, to inform him of the real position. Although Duryodhana is mentioned as the king, he still had to go to the commander on account of the seriousness of the situation. He was therefore quite fit to be a politician. But Duryodhana's diplomatic veneer could not disguise the fear he felt when he saw the military arrangement of the Pāṇḍavas.
    « Last Edit: February 03, 2013, 12:10:08 PM by SS91 »
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #5 on: February 04, 2013, 12:59:29 PM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.3


    paśyaitāḿ pāṇḍu-putrāṇām
    ācārya mahatīḿ camūm
    vyūḍhāḿ drupada-putreṇa
    tava śiṣyeṇa dhīmatā


    SYNONYMS
    paśya — behold; etām — this; pāṇḍu-putrāṇām — of the sons of Pāṇḍu; ācārya — O teacher; mahatīm — great; camūm — military force; vyūḍhām — arranged; drupada-putreṇa — by the son of Drupada; tava — your; śiṣyeṇa — disciple; dhī-matā — very intelligent.


    TRANSLATION
    O my teacher, behold the great army of the sons of Pāṇḍu, so expertly arranged by your intelligent disciple the son of Drupada.

    PURPORT
    Duryodhana, a great diplomat, wanted to point out the defects of Droṇācārya, the great brāhmaṇa commander in chief. Droṇācārya had some political quarrel with King Drupada, the father of Draupadī, who was Arjuna's wife. As a result of this quarrel, Drupada performed a great sacrifice, by which he received the benediction of having a son who would be able to kill Droṇācārya. Droṇācārya knew this perfectly well, and yet as a liberal brāhmaṇa he did not hesitate to impart all his military secrets when the son of Drupada, Dhṛṣṭadyumna, was entrusted to him for military education. Now, on the Battlefield of Kurukṣetra, Dhṛṣṭadyumna took the side of the Pāṇḍavas, and it was he who arranged for their military phalanx, after having learned the art from Droṇācārya. Duryodhana pointed out this mistake of Droṇācārya's so that he might be alert and uncompromising in the fighting. By this he wanted to point out also that he should not be similarly lenient in battle against the Pāṇḍavas, who were also Droṇācārya's affectionate students. Arjuna, especially, was his most affectionate and brilliant student. Duryodhana also warned that such leniency in the fight would lead to defeat.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #6 on: February 05, 2013, 01:39:43 PM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.4


    atra śūrā maheṣv-āsā
    bhīmārjuna-samā yudhi
    yuyudhāno virāṭaś ca
    drupadaś ca mahā-rathaḥ


    SYNONYMS

    atra — here; śūrāḥ — heroes; mahā-iṣu-āsāḥ — mighty bowmen; bhīma-arjuna — to Bhīma and Arjuna; samāḥ — equal; yudhi — in the fight; yuyudhānaḥ — Yuyudhāna; virāṭaḥ — Virāṭa; ca — also; drupadaḥ — Drupada; ca — also; mahā-rathaḥ — great fighter.

    TRANSLATION

    Here in this army are many heroic bowmen equal in fighting to Bhīma and Arjuna: great fighters like Yuyudhāna, Virāṭa and Drupada.

    PURPORT

    Even though Dhṛṣṭadyumna was not a very important obstacle in the face of Droṇācārya's very great power in the military art, there were many others who were causes of fear. They are mentioned by Duryodhana as great stumbling blocks on the path of victory because each and every one of them was as formidable as Bhīma and Arjuna. He knew the strength of Bhīma and Arjuna, and thus he compared the others with them.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #7 on: February 06, 2013, 02:35:27 PM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.5


    dhṛṣṭaketuś cekitānaḥ
    kāśirājaś ca vīryavān
    purujit kuntibhojaś ca
    śaibyaś ca nara-puńgavaḥ


    SYNONYMS

    dhṛṣṭaketuḥ — Dhṛṣṭaketu; cekitānaḥ — Cekitāna; kāśirājaḥ — Kāśirāja; ca — also; vīrya-vān — very powerful; purujit — Purujit; kuntibhojaḥ — Kuntibhoja; ca — and; śaibyaḥ — Śaibya; ca — and; nara-puńgavaḥ — hero in human society.


    TRANSLATION

    There are also great, heroic, powerful fighters like Dhṛṣṭaketu, Cekitāna, Kāśirāja, Purujit, Kuntibhoja and Śaibya.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
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    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #8 on: February 08, 2013, 09:15:08 AM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.6

    yudhāmanyuś ca vikrānta
    uttamaujāś ca vīryavān
    saubhadro draupadeyāś ca
    sarva eva mahā-rathāḥ


    SYNONYMS

    yudhāmanyuḥ — Yudhāmanyu; ca — and; vikrāntaḥ — mighty; uttamaujāḥ — Uttamaujā; ca — and; vīrya-vān — very powerful; saubhadraḥ — the son of Subhadrā; draupadeyāḥ — the sons of Draupadī; ca — and; sarve — all; eva — certainly; mahā-rathāḥ — great chariot fighters.

    TRANSLATION


    There are the mighty Yudhāmanyu, the very powerful Uttamaujā, the son of Subhadrā and the sons of Draupadī. All these warriors are great chariot fighters.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
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    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #9 on: February 09, 2013, 04:25:01 PM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.7

    asmākaḿ tu viśiṣṭā ye

    tān nibodha dvijottama

    nāyakā mama sainyasya

    saḿjñārthaḿ tān bravīmi te


    SYNONYMS

    asmākam — our; tu — but; viśiṣṭāḥ — especially powerful; ye — who; tān — them; nibodha — just take note of, be informed; dvija-uttama — O best of the brāhmaṇas; nāyakāḥ — captains; mama — my; sainyasya — of the soldiers; saḿjñā-artham — for information; tān — them; bravīmi — I am speaking; te — to you.

    TRANSLATION

    But for your information, O best of the brāhmaṇas, let me tell you about the captains who are especially qualified to lead my military force.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #10 on: February 10, 2013, 12:00:42 PM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.8
    bhavān bhīṣmaś ca karṇaś ca

    kṛpaś ca samitiḿ-jayaḥ

    aśvatthāmā vikarṇaś ca

    saumadattis tathaiva ca


    SYNONYMS

    bhavān — your good self; bhīṣmaḥ — Grandfather Bhīṣma; ca — also; karṇaḥ — Karṇa; ca — and; kṛpaḥ — Kṛpa; ca — and; samitim-jayaḥ — always victorious in battle; aśvatthāmā — Aśvatthāmā; vikarṇaḥ — Vikarṇa; ca — as well as; saumadattiḥ — the son of Somadatta; tathā — as well as; eva — certainly; ca — also.

    TRANSLATION

    There are personalities like you, Bhīṣma, Karṇa, Kṛpa, Aśvatthāmā, Vikarṇa and the son of Somadatta called Bhūriśravā, who are always victorious in battle.

    PURPORT

    Duryodhana mentions the exceptional heroes in the battle, all of whom are ever victorious. Vikarṇa is the brother of Duryodhana, Aśvatthāmā is the son of Droṇācārya, and Saumadatti, or Bhūriśravā, is the son of the King of the Bāhlīkas. Karṇa is the half brother of Arjuna, as he was born of Kuntī before her marriage with King Pāṇḍu. Kṛpācārya's twin sister married Droṇācārya.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #11 on: February 11, 2013, 12:56:05 PM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.9


    anye ca bahavaḥ śūrā
    mad-arthe tyakta-jīvitāḥ
    nānā-śastra-praharaṇāḥ
    sarve yuddha-viśāradāḥ


    SYNONYMS

    anye — others; ca — also; bahavaḥ — in great numbers; śūrāḥ — heroes; mat-arthe — for my sake; tyakta-jīvitāḥ — prepared to risk life; nānā — many; śastra — weapons; praharaṇāḥ — equipped with; sarve — all of them; yuddha-viśāradāḥ — experienced in military science.

    TRANSLATION

    There are many other heroes who are prepared to lay down their lives for my sake. All of them are well equipped with different kinds of weapons, and all are experienced in military science.

    PURPORT

    As far as the others are concerned — like Jayadratha, Kṛtavarmā and Śalya — all are determined to lay down their lives for Duryodhana's sake. In other words, it is already concluded that all of them would die in the Battle of Kurukṣetra for joining the party of the sinful Duryodhana. Duryodhana was, of course, confident of his victory on account of the above-mentioned combined strength of his friends.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #12 on: February 14, 2013, 11:44:34 AM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.10


    aparyāptaḿ tad asmākaḿ
    balaḿ bhīṣmābhirakṣitam
    paryāptaḿ tv idam eteṣāḿ
    balaḿ bhīmābhirakṣitam


    SYNONYMS

    aparyāptam — immeasurable; tat — that; asmākam — of ours; balam — strength; bhīṣma — by Grandfather Bhīṣma; abhirakṣitam — perfectly protected; paryāptam — limited; tu — but; idam — all this; eteṣām — of the Pāṇḍavas; balam — strength; bhīma — by Bhīma; abhirakṣitam — carefully protected.

    TRANSLATION


    Our strength is immeasurable, and we are perfectly protected by Grandfather Bhīṣma, whereas the strength of the Pāṇḍavas, carefully protected by Bhīma, is limited.

    PURPORT

    Herein an estimation of comparative strength is made by Duryodhana. He thinks that the strength of his armed forces is immeasurable, being specifically protected by the most experienced general, Grandfather Bhīṣma. On the other hand, the forces of the Pāṇḍavas are limited, being protected by a less experienced general, Bhīma, who is like a fig in the presence of Bhīṣma. Duryodhana was always envious of Bhīma because he knew perfectly well that if he should die at all, he would only be killed by Bhīma. But at the same time, he was confident of his victory on account of the presence of Bhīṣma, who was a far superior general. His conclusion that he would come out of the battle victorious was well ascertained.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #13 on: February 15, 2013, 05:33:59 PM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.11

    ayaneṣu ca sarveṣu

    yathā-bhāgam avasthitāḥ

    bhīṣmam evābhirakṣantu

    bhavantaḥ sarva eva hi


    SYNONYMS

    ayaneṣu — in the strategic points; ca — also; sarveṣu — everywhere; yathā-bhāgam — as differently arranged; avasthitāḥ — situated; bhīṣmam — unto Grandfather Bhīṣma; eva — certainly; abhirakṣantu — should give support; bhavantaḥ — you; sarve — all respectively; eva hi — certainly.

    TRANSLATION

    All of you must now give full support to Grandfather Bhīṣma, as you stand at your respective strategic points of entrance into the phalanx of the army.

    PURPORT

    Duryodhana, after praising the prowess of Bhīṣma, further considered that others might think that they had been considered less important, so in his usual diplomatic way, he tried to adjust the situation in the above words. He emphasized that Bhīṣmadeva was undoubtedly the greatest hero, but he was an old man, so everyone must especially think of his protection from all sides. He might become engaged in the fight, and the enemy might take advantage of his full engagement on one side. Therefore, it was important that other heroes not leave their strategic positions and allow the enemy to break the phalanx. Duryodhana clearly felt that the victory of the Kurus depended on the presence of Bhīṣmadeva. He was confident of the full support of Bhīṣmadeva and Droṇācārya in the battle because he well knew that they did not even speak a word when Arjuna's wife Draupadī, in her helpless condition, had appealed to them for justice while she was being forced to appear naked in the presence of all the great generals in the assembly. Although he knew that the two generals had some sort of affection for the Pāṇḍavas, he hoped that these generals would now completely give it up, as they had done during the gambling performances
    .
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline PiyaSoni

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    Re: The Meaning of Peace in the Bhagavad Gita
    « Reply #14 on: February 16, 2013, 12:28:01 AM »
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  • Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gītā As It Is 1.12

    tasya sañjanayan harṣaḿ
    kuru-vṛddhaḥ pitāmahaḥ
    siḿha-nādaḿ vinadyoccaiḥ
    śańkhaḿ dadhmau pratāpavān


    SYNONYMS

    tasya — his;
    sañjanayan — increasing;
    harṣam — cheerfulness;
    kuru-vṛddhaḥ — the grandsire of the Kuru dynasty (Bhīṣma);
    pitāmahaḥ — the grandfather;
    siḿha-nādam — roaring sound, like that of a lion;
    vinadya — vibrating;
    uccaiḥ — very loudly;
    śańkham — conchshell;
    dadhmau — blew;
    pratāpa-vān — the valiant.


    TRANSLATION

    Then Bhīṣma, the great valiant grandsire of the Kuru dynasty, the grandfather of the fighters, blew his conchshell very loudly, making a sound like the roar of a lion, giving Duryodhana joy.

    PURPORT

    The grandsire of the Kuru dynasty could understand the inner meaning of the heart of his grandson Duryodhana, and out of his natural compassion for him he tried to cheer him by blowing his conchshell very loudly, befitting his position as a lion. Indirectly, by the symbolism of the conchshell, he informed his depressed grandson Duryodhana that he had no chance of victory in the battle, because the Supreme Lord Kṛiṣhṇa was on the other side. But still, it was his duty to conduct the fight, and no pains would be spared in that connection.
    "नानक नाम चढदी कला, तेरे पहाणे सर्वद दा भला "

     


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