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Author Topic: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories  (Read 64295 times)

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Offline SS91

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Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
« Reply #90 on: December 21, 2010, 09:16:59 AM »
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  • Curse on Bali


    After Sugreeva recited the Dundubhi story, he showed Rama the demon's carcass, which lay nearby. He then told Rama the truth about making Rishyamookha his hiding spot.

    He informed Rama that the famous sage Matang Muni lived in the Rishyamookha mountain. When Bali had swung the battered body of  Dundubhi  from Kishkindha, it fell inside his ashram. The sage had become enraged because he had built the ashram after years of worship and used to organise his Yajnas here. Matang Muni roared, "Who dares to sully my ashram with a blood-smeared corpse?" When no answer came, he sat down in deep meditation and discovered the name Bali. In a fury, the sage cursed Bali and his men by saying that if ever they entered the forests of Rishyamookha they would be destroyed. Sugreeva thus added that because Bali would hunt him down wherever he went, he took shelter in these forests knowing that he could not enter it.
     
     
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
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    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #91 on: December 21, 2010, 09:18:29 AM »
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  • Curse on Parikshit
    Abhimanyu's son, Parikshit became the king of Hastinapur after the Pandavas left for the mountains.

    One day, while wandering in a forest, Parikshit felt thirsty. He came upon a Sage and asked him for some water. The Sage was meditating and did not hear Parikshit. Losing his temper, the king lifted a dead snake and put it on the shoulders of the sage like a garland. Just then, the sage's son returned and saw the king do this. He was furious and cursed Parikshit to die from a snakebite within seven days. The sage scolded his son and sent a message to the king informing him about the curse. Soon, a big palace was built for Parikshit where he could be safe from snakes.

    However, on the seventh day, the king of serpents, Takshaka, disguised himself as a worm and entered a fruit. A soon as the king bit the fruit,  Takshaka assumed his real form and coiled himself around Parikshit, killing him.
     
     
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #92 on: December 22, 2010, 08:04:53 AM »
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  • The Descent of Ganga


    Once upon a time, long ago, demons and gods were at war. To defeat the gods, the demons made a plan. During the day, they hid in the ocean and at night they attacked the gods. Afraid of being defeated in this way, the gods went to Sage Agastya for help.

    Agastya solved their problem by drinking the whole ocean. Now as the demons had no place to hide, the gods easily defeated them. The gods then asked Agastya to bring the ocean back. Agastya said that he could not do that because he had already digested the ocean.

    The people of the earth now had no water, as the ocean was empty, The gods were worried and went to Vishnu and requested him to bring water on earth, King Sagara, who had sixty thousand sons, was performing a yagna to conquer the whole world. According to custom, he had sent out a white horse, the ruler of that kingdom would either have to fight with Sagara or give him his crown. In this way, Sagara was conquering the whole earth and wanted to be the most powerful. Indra, took the horse and hid it in sage Kapila's ashram. Sagara sent his sons to search the horse. They reached Kapila's ashram. Sage Kapila was meditating and was disturbed. Greatly annoyed, with one look of his eyes. Kapila burnt all of them to ashes. Sagara was very sad at the death of his sons. He wanted to purify the souls of his sons but only river Ganga could do that by washing their ashes. Ganga had to be brought to earth. So Sagara performed tapasya to please Brahma. But he died before finishing the tapasya. His grandson then continued to perform the tapasya.

    The seventh descendent of Sagara, Bhagiratha, was able to please Brahma. Brahma granted him his wish and asked Ganga to flow to earth. But Ganga didn't want to leave heaven and go to earth. She threatened to destroy all life on earth by the pressure of her flow. Only Shiva's powerful hair could control the force of Ganga. Bhagiratha requested Shiva to help him. Shiva spread his hair and covered the sky. As soon as Ganga flowed down, he collected her water in his hair in the form of many small streams. She then followed Bhagiratha to the place where the ashes of his ancestors were lying. Being young Ganga flowed carelessly. She flooded the ashram of Sage Jahnu. Jahnu was performing a yagna at that time the water put out all the fires. Angry Jahnu swallowed Ganga. But when he came to know about the long tapasya that had been performed to bring Ganga to earth, he agreed to let her go. He cut open his left thigh and Ganga flowed out of it. Ganga came to be known as Jahnvi, the daughter of Jhanu.

    Ganga flowed on and purified the ashes of Bhagiratha's ancestors. Therefore, Ganga is also called Bhagirathi. There after, Ganga flowed and filled the empty ocean.

    The ocean came to be known as Sagara after the name of King Sagara. the people of earth now had water to drink.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #93 on: December 22, 2010, 08:13:06 AM »
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  • Devhuti

    Manu and Satarupa had a daughter named Devhuti. She wanted to marry the legendary sage, Kardama. To fulfil their daughter's wish, Manu and Satarupa went to meet Kardama.

    Kardama agreed to the proposal, but he lay a condition that as soon as Devhuti had a child, he would retire to the forests. Manu agreed and got them married. After some years Devhuti gave birth to nine daughters and Kardama got ready to leave. Devhuti pleaded with him saying that she wouldn't be able to shoulder the responsibility of bringing up her daughters alone.

    Kardama assured her that if she drowned herself in God's worship he would help her. Devhuti began worshipping the lord and was granted a son named Kapil. Her daughters were married off, and under Kapil's guidance, Devhuti began her meditation on the banks of Saraswati, Completely lost in God, She attained salvation at the palace, Which is today known as Siddhipad.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #94 on: December 23, 2010, 09:45:22 AM »
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  • Dhoomravarna

    Dhoomravarna is Ganesha's eight incarnation. Ahantasura, the demon of pride, had learnt the Ganesha mantra from the demon priest, Shukracharya. He chanted the mantra for a thousand years and Ganesha blessed him with the boon of being invincible. Ahantasura began spreading terror everywhere. The gods went to Shiva and Vishnu and were asked to chant the Ganesha mantra.

    Ganesha finally appeared as Dhoomravarna after a thousand years of prayers. He sent Narada to Ahantasura advising him to give up all his wrong deeds, but the demon did not agree. Angry at the demon's behaviour, Dhoomravarna threw his Ugrapash, the noose, and destroyed his entire army. Ahantasura ran to Shukracharya for help, who advised him to surrender. Ahantasura fell at Dhoomravarna's feet and prayed for forgiveness. Though he was forgiven, Ahantasura was restricted to staying only in patal lok (nether world).
     
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #95 on: December 23, 2010, 09:48:47 AM »
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  • Draupadi's Swayamvara

    Draupadi was the beautiful daughter of Drupada, the king of Panchala. Drupada arranged a swayamvara for Draupadi's marriage in the Panchala court. At the centre of the court a pole was erected over which there was a revolving wheel. On the wheel was a wooden fish. At the bottom of the pole there was a pan of water. The one, who could shoot an arrow at the eye of revolving fish while looking at its reflection in the water below, would marry Draupadi. This was the condition for the swayamvara. Princes from all over assembled for the swayamvara. The Pandavas who were at that time living as Brahmins were also present. Duryodhana, Karna, and Shri Krishna were also present. As the Swayamvara began, many brave princes tried to win the hand of Draupadi, but failed to perform the difficult task of shooting the fish's eye. When Karna came forward to show his skill, Draupadi stopped him and said, "I will not marry a charioteer's son." Insulted, Karna left the court.

    When all the princes were unsuccessful in performing the feat, Drupada became worried about the marriage of his daughter. Suddenly, Arjuna dressed as a Brahmin rose to try the feat. Nobody was able to recognise him. All the princes objected to the participation of a Brahmin in a competition that was meant for them. But looking at the build and confidence of the Brahmin, no one dared to say anything. Arjuna easily shot the fish's eye. Draupadi was very happy and she put the wedding garland around Arjuna's neck.

    All the princes felt humiliated and were jealous of Arjuna. They attacked him. Bhima came to his rescue. The mighty Pandavas easily defeated all the princes and took Draupadi with them. Drishtdyumna, Draupadi's brother, followed them to find out who the Brahmin was. When they reached their hut, the Pandavas called out to their mother, Kunti, "Look, Mother, what we have brought." Kunti replied from inside the hut, "Share it among yourselves," thinking that they had brought food. When she saw the bride and was told that she was Arjuna's wife, Kunti was very unhappy at what she had said. As a custom, the Pandavas would have to obey every word that she had said - Draupadi would have to become the wife of all five brothers. Just then Krishna came to their hut. He told Kunti, "in her previous life Draupadi had worshipped Shiva to get a husband with five qualities. But Shiva had given her a boon that in her next life she would marry five men each having one quality." On hearing this Kunti felt satisfied and Draupadi became the wife of all five Pandavas.

    Dhrishtadyumna who had followed them, heard all this. He went back to his father Drupada and said, "I have good news for you. The brave Brahmin who married Draupadi was none other than the great Arjuna." Drupada was delighted to hear this. But when he came to know that Draupadi was to be the wife of all the five Pandavas, he was sad, because this was against the law. At that time, Sage Vyasa came there. He told Drupada, "Though such a marriage is not permitted in the Holy Scriptures, this particular marriage is a result of a boon by Shiva himself, so it is not against the law." Satisfied Drupada arranged for a reception at the palace. The Pandavas were invited and the wedding between the Pandavas and Draupadi was performed with great splendour.
     
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #96 on: December 23, 2010, 09:52:49 AM »
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  • Dronacharya Becomes the Commander-in-chief

    After the fall of Bhisma, Doryodhana wanted Karna to be the next commander-in-chief. He knew that Karna was capable of defeating Arjuna and asked him to take  charge of the army. However Karna asked Duryodhana to make Drona the commander-in-chief as this would be acceptable to everyone. Duryodhana liked the idea and Dronacharya was made the commander-in-chief. The Kaurava army got a new breath of life because they were sure that the brave guru would lead them to victory. Karna had pledged that he would not fight under Drona, so he left the battlefield. But Drona requested him to forget all grudges and joined the battle for the sake of his friend, Duryodhana. To everybody's joy, Karna agreed and joined the battle.  Duryodhana knew that Drona would never kill any of the Pandavas so he asked him to capture Yudhisthira alive. Drona did not mind carrying out this order and rearranged the army to achieve this end.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #97 on: January 04, 2011, 10:08:30 AM »
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  • Drona's Test

    Acharya Drona was the teacher of the princes' of Hastinapur. Arjuna was his favourite student, so all the other students were jealous of him. To prove that Arjuna was the best student, Drona decided to conduct a test .

    He hung a wooden bird from a tree and asked each prince to shoot at the bird's eye. First the eldest prince, Yudhishthira, was asked to try. When he aimed at the bird, Drona asked him, "what do you see in front of you?" Yudhisthira answered, "I see a tree and a bird hearing this, Drona stopped him. He then asked other students the same question and got the same answer.

    When it was Arjuna's turn and Drona asked him the same question, Arjuna replied, "I see only the bird's eye. Drona was very pleased with the answer and asked him to shoot. The arrow hit the bird's eye. Drona told all his students that the best archer is the one who can only see his target and nothing else.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #98 on: January 04, 2011, 10:10:20 AM »
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  • Durgam and the Vedas

    Durgam, the king of the demons once asked his minister, "why is it that the gods are always able to win over us? They must have secret powers."

    He replied, "The gods have the knowledge of Vedas which gives them great powers."

    Durgam decided to get the Vedas and performed a long Tapasya. When Brahma appeared, he requested him to make him the protector of the Vedas. But instead of protecting them, he took and hid them in patal-lok (netherworld).

    The yajnas performed with the help of the Vedas used to help the gods and sages became old and weak. On earth, drought and famine occurred because no yajnas were performed to cause rain. There was death and destruction everywhere. Terrified, the gods went to Vishnu for help. He asked them to worship Jagatmata Ma Bhagwati gave them a leaf, it rained on earth and prosperity was restored. Then Ma Bhagwati formed ten goddesses - Kali, Tara, Chinnamastaka, Shrividya, Bhubaneswari, Bhairavi, Bagula, Dhrumra, Tripura, and Matangi from her body. With these goddesses she attacked Durgam and defeated him. The Vedas were restored to the gods and sages.
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #99 on: February 01, 2011, 06:37:07 PM »
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  • Sudhama
     

    God Krishna had in his student days a classmate, who was very poor. His name was Sudhama. Krishna became king of Dwaraka later on.

    Sudhama remained a poor householder. He had many children. He was, however, a good-loving man.

    Everyday Sudhama went out singing bhajans in the streets. People gave him handfuls of rice. He came home and gave the rice to his wife. She cooked it. Sudhama first offered the food of God. Next he gave part of it to his guests. Then he fed his children. The husband and wife ate what remained.

    Sudhama never stored food for the next day. He was sure God would feed him everyday, as He had always fed him.

    When the children grew up, the alms Sudhama brought were not enough. On some days they had to go without food. Sudhama had no fine clothes to wear. He was in rags. So people called him 'Kuchela'. It means a man with torn clothes.

    One day Sudhama's wife said to him: "Lord! Why don't you meet Krishna? You were at school together. He will surely help us!"

    Sudhama had been wanting to see his friend Krishna, not for money, but for the joy of meeting a beloved friend.

    When we go to see a baby, a great man or God in a temple we must not go without gifts. We must take with us some sweets as a token of affection or respect. Sudhama took what his wife could give him-a small package of beaten rice. They were that poor.

    Sudhama walked all the way to Dwaraka. When he reached Krishna's palace, he went in.

    Krishna saw him from a distance. At once he rushed out and met Sudhama at the gate. He gave him a great welcome. He embraced him. He washed Sudhama's feet. He took him to his room, and seated him on a silken cot. Krishna's wife Rukmini gently fanned Sudhama. The maids-in- waiting gave him plenty of sweet food and delicious drink in golden vessels.

    Sudhama had never seen such a beautiful palace of such riches. No one had ever treated him so nicely before. So he did not even know how to thank Krishna for the hospitality.

    After Sudhama had taken a rest, Krishna spoke to him of their student days and about their teacher, Sandipani.

    At last Krishna said to him: "Are you married? How many children have you?" Sudhama nodded his head shyly, meaning to say that he was happy and content. "I am sure you have brought something for me to eat," said Krishna suddenly.

    Sudhama was ashamed to take out the package of beaten rice. But Krishna saw the bag and pulled it out. Taking a handful from and putting it in his mouth, he said: "How nice of your wife to have sent this to me?" Then he ate two more handfuls.

    After spending the day happily at Dwaraka, Sudhama took leave of Krishna, and walked back to his village.

    He completely forgot to ask for any gift of favor of Krishna.

    On the way he as thinking how loyal and generous Krishna had been.

    When Sudhama reached home, a great miracle waited for him there.

    There was a grand palace where his old home had been. Many servants went about doing all kinds of work. His wife stood before him. She wore a costly sari and had golden ornaments on! All his children wore gorgeous clothes. He could not believe his eyes.

    Sudhama's wife said:"It all happened by the grace of Krishna."

    Sudhama worshipped Krishna with greater devotion than ever before.
       ;D  JAI SAI RAM  ;D


     
     
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #100 on: February 05, 2011, 03:31:03 PM »
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  • Durga - The Slayer Of Mahishasura
     
    Once upon a time there lived a demon (Asura) named Mahisha. He found great happiness in hurting people. Once, he decided to pray to lord Brahma, who he thought would give him a boon, which would make him invincible.

    Mahisha performed severe penances praying and fasting for months as he stood on one foot. The three worlds trembled under the strength of his penances and a pleased lord Brahma came to give him a boon. Mahisha asked for immortality, which the lord said he could not have as every creature that was born had to die. Mahisha decided that he would ask for a boon that would make him as good as immortal. He asked that no man should be able to kill and, if he had to die it should be only at the hands of only a woman. He was sure that no woman could ever fight against him however strong she may be.

    Now that Mahisha was invincible, he and the other asuras went about hurting and killing everyone on earth and then went on to the heavens to fight the Gods. Even Indra's thunderbolt could not withstand the asura attack. Mahisha drove out the Gods and took over Indra's throne. Mahishasura started harassing all pious people who continued praying to Vishnu or Shiva. The Gods and people were depressed and decided to ask lord Shiva for help. Lord Shiva, Vishnu, and Brahma concentrated hard and used their radiant energies, which were joined by the energies from Indra, and the other Gods. This godly energy took the form of a divine lady with thousand arms. In each arm she carried a weapon belonging to all Gods. This was Durga Devi.

    She mounted a fiery lion and roared. It was a roar that shook mountains and created huge waves in the seas. Even Mahisha was worried for a second, but his vanity took over when he saw that the terrible form was that of a woman. Durga created a large army from her breath to fight Mahisha's army and then fought with Mahisha who came in the form of a Buffalo. As he struggled to set himself from the Buffalo form she killed him with her sword delivering the earth and heavens of the Burden called Mahishasura.

    In Mysore (Karnataka) atop the Chamundi hills, you can see a big statue of Mahishasura. Here there is a temple dedicated to Durga also known as Mahishasura mardini or Chamundi.

     
     
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #101 on: February 05, 2011, 03:35:30 PM »
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  • Devavrat


    King Shantanu was a famous king of Hastinapur. He was married to Gangadevi, who gave birth to a son, Devavrat. On account of her past life's karma, she went to Heaven leaving Devavrat in his father's care. He was taught the Vedas, and the Puranas, and also archery, by the greatest archer of the time, Parshuram. Devavrat learned from his father how to rule the kingdom following the ideals of truth and justice. Devavrat was trained in every way to take up the throne. King Shantanu in due time enthroned Devavrat as the Crown Prince. Devavrat looked after his subjects with love and kindness.
    One day, King Shantanu went out on a hunting expedition and saw a very charming young girl. She was the daughter of a fisherman named Dashraj. Her name was Satyavati. He asked her hand in marriage, but she replied telling him to ask her father for her hand. When he sent messengers to her father asking for her hand in marriage, the shrewd old fisherman would not relent. He asked, “Shantanu is not young any more. Who would care for my daughter, were he to die?”

    King Shantanu decided to go in person and tried to persuade him with promises of riches and rewards, but the fisherman was  adamant. “Nothing less than the throne for my daughter Satyavati and her descendants is acceptable,” he said stubbornly. Dashraj was keeping the future interest of his daughter in mind. Shantanu thought that he couldn't harm his beloved son Devavrat's future of whom he was so proud, yet he longed to marry Satyavati. He couldn't bear this dilemma and this caused the king to be sick. He spent all his time alone, he wouldn't speak to any one.

    Devavrat saw that his father was always sad. He inquired of his father and got no answer. Devavrat went to inquire the reason from the charioteer who disclosed everything. In order to keep his father happy, Devavrat went to see Satyavati's father Dashraj and promised that for his father's sake he would give up the throne. “This is my vow and I shall be true to it,” he said assuring Dashraj who was still worried. He said, “You will keep your oath alright, but your son will fight my daughter's son for the throne. What will happen then?” But Devavrat immediately set Dishrag's fear at ease, saying, “I take another oath, I swear in the name of my parents, I shall never marry. This is my firm vow.” Upon hearing this, Dashraj gladly agreed to his daughter's marriage with the king.

    As young Devavrat, took this pledge, the heavens opened and the gods cried out “Bhishma!”, as they showered flowers upon him to honor his selfless resolve. Ever since then, Devavrat was known as Bhishma or the one who makes and keeps a great vow. When Devavrat took his new mother Satyavati to his father, King Shantanu was amazed when he heard about his son's vows. He was full of praise for him. His father granted him a boon, “Death will not come to you unless you give your explicit permission to it, and Death will wait upon you with folded hands.” Satyavati married King Shantanu and bore him two sons, Chitrangada and Vichitraveerya. After King Shantanu died, they ruled the kingdom.

    Bhishma (Devavrat) kept up with his promises until the end of his life. He lived for 4 generations. He protected the kingdom of Hastinapur and its kings from all odds but never ever desired for a throne, though he deserved it. Later, in the Mahabharata war, just to keep up the promise, he had to support evil Duryodhana as he was the prince of Hastinapur kingdom. Being wounded by Arjuna during the Mahabharata war, Bhishma desired to embrace death on the day of Makar-Sankranti.

     
     
     
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
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    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #102 on: February 05, 2011, 03:46:31 PM »
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  • Bhageerath

     
    King Sagar was one of the greatest kings of Ancient Bharat (India). He was the ancestor of King Dasharath and Lord Rama (Incarnation of Sree Vishnu). In those days, kings used to perform Ashwamedha Yajna to prove their supremacy over others. Once, king Sagar, too, performed a Ashwamedha Yajna to become the king of the entire world. He deserved it anyway!! 
    But, Lord Indra was jealous and fearful over the results of the Yajna. He decided to stop the Yajna by stealing the horse of the Yajna that was sent around the earth, as a symbol of victory. In an act of jealousy, Lord Indra kidnapped the horse and hid it in Kapil Muni's hermitage.

    When learnt that the horse is kidnapped, King Sagar's hundreds of sons along with the entourage of warriors went to search. They found the horse of the Yajna in Kapil Muni's Ashram. They mistook Sage Kapil to be the abductor and attacked him. Kapil Muni became enraged that King Sagar's sons were attacking him for no apparent reason; he burnt all of them to ashes.

    King Sagar was worried about his sons' salvation. Pacified Kapil Muni advised that the holy river Ganga could give them salvation. The waters of the holy river Ganga would miraculously bring back the dead princes to life. It should be brought down to the Earth from the heaven. King Sagar's son Dilip tried his best, but could not succeed. His grandson Anshuman succeeded upto some limit but could not give them salvation.

    Bhageerath was another grandson of King Sagar. He heard about the plight of his father and uncles. Bhageerath resolved to bring Ganga to the Earth from the Heaven to purify the ashes of his ancestors and bring them back to life.

    He performed severe penance to please Lord Brahma who came to bless him and grant him the desired boon. Ganga was allowed to come down to Earth. The only problem was that the force of its current was too great for Earth to withstand. Fearing a catastrophe, Bhageerath prayed to Lord Shiva, who held out his matted hair to catch the river as she descended. From this point onward, Lord Shiva is also known as Gangadhara. River Ganga then gently followed Bhageerath as he came to the hermitage of Sage Jahnu's ashram. Sage Jahnu, who was in a state of meditation inside the ashram, had been disrupted in his penance. He became enraged and swallowed Ganga in a single gulp.

    Bhageerath offered his prayers to Sage Jahnu who finally released Ganga. As a result Ganga is also known by the name of Jahnavi.

    Finally, Bhageerath overcame all the obstacles in the process of releasing Ganga. He patiently led Ganga down to the sea where Kapil Muni was residing. Holy Ganga then bathed the remains of the King Sagar's sons, offered salvation to the souls of them and merged into the sea-water. Thus the sea where Ganga merges is called as “Ganga Sagar”.

    Ganga is also known as Bhageerathi because her coming to the Earth was by the continued sacrifices and efforts of Bhageerath.

     
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #103 on: February 05, 2011, 03:48:33 PM »
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  • Bala Shivaji 
     
    A young prince is seated on the throne. His soldiers have brought a handcuffed Patil (a village chief) before him. Patil, with a thick and long moustache, had dishonored a helpless widow. In a stern and majestic tone the young prince announced the judgment, “cut off his both hands and feet!! This is the least punishment for the crime he has committed”. All present were taken aback at the firm devotion of the prince to justice. Not only were they wonder-struck but also pleased beyond measure. The village people began to say to one another: ‘Ah! Look! How devoted to justice our young prince is!? He is not in the least afraid of the wicked people. He is kind and loving towards the poor, the downfallen and the wretched. He is ever determined to help them and to protect them. What is more, he regards all women as mothers!
    Don't you wish to know who this young prince was? He was none other than Shivaji. At the time of this incident he was just fourteen. In another incident…… in Nachani village of Pune province, a ferocious and huge cheetah was creating nuisance. He  used to attack villagers suddenly and run away into the jungle. Scared villagers ran to Shivaji for help. They cried, “Save us from this wild animal. He has killed so many children. He attacks us especially in the night when everyone is sleeping”. After patiently listening to the villagers, he said, ‘don?t worry!! Calm down. I am here to help you”. Shivaji, along with his chieftain Yesaji and few soldiers, went to the jungle. As soon as the cheetah appeared, Shivaji's soldiers frightened and backed off. But Shivaji and Yesaji bravely confronted the Cheetah and killed him in no time. Villagers rejoiced and hailed, “Jay Shivaji!!”

    Shivaji's father's name was Shahaji. He was always away from home, fighting wars. How he became aware of this fearless and unique nature of his son is itself an interesting story. On a certain occasion, Shahaji took his son to the court of the Sultan of Bijapur. Shahaji and all others touched the ground thrice and saluted the Sultan. He asked his son Shivaji to do the same thing. But.....! Shivaji stood erect with his head unbent. He seemed to be determined that he would not bow down to a foreign  ruler. He walked back from the court with a lion-like gait and bearing.

    You may ask: how did Shivaji acquire all these noble virtues - courage, heroism, love of the motherland and love of Dharma? Even when he was a little child, his mother Jijabai used to tell him stories of heroes, of saints and sages who appear in the Ramayana, and the Mahabharatha. She taught him all about Hindu Samskars and patriotism. As Shivaji listened to these tales of heroism and Dharmik deeds, he grew more and more eager to be like Rama or Krishna, Bheema or Arjuna. His teacher and guide, Dadoji Kondadev was a great man. He not only taught Shivaji about all kinds of warfare tactics but also about politics and good administration. Both, Dadoji Kondadev and Jijabai, carved his personality.

    Though Shivaji was a prince, he enjoyed playing with anyone of his age and easily mixed up with the common peple. Soon, he became the heart of all. At the age of twelve, he and his friends took the oath of defeating foreign rulers and establish swarajya where people can live fearless and happy and follow their dharma. At the young age of sixteen, he started raising his own  army. In the same age, he captured one of the forts. It was the fort of Torana. Another meaning of Torana is garland. Jijabai proudly said, ‘look! Shivaji has brought us a garland of  independence!”.

    As Shivaji grew old, he fought many wars and defeated several lieutenants and commanders of foreign rulers. While fighting with the enemies, he put himself in a grave danger very often. He not only established his independent sovereign against all  odds but also undertook reforms to make his people happy. He inspired and united the common man to fight against the tyranny of foreign rulers such as Aurangjeb, by inculcating a sense of pride and nationality in them. Isn't it great about Shivaji? Sant (sage) Ramadas was his spiritual guru (teacher). He sang in praise of Shivaji: “The land and its Dharma have been uplifted. A kingdom of bliss has arisen.”

    After reading the thrilling and inspiring tale of  Shivaji, don't we feel that we too should follow the example of Shivaji? Why is this so? It is because Shivaji underwent all hardships for the sake of his country, for the sake of its Dharma. He did not care for his own life and quite often entered the very jaws of death. Till his last breath, he lived for his country and for the Dharma of the Hindus. It is nearly three hundred years since he died but the memory of this great man lights up the torch of inspiration.

     
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
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    Offline SS91

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    Re: Tales From Ancient India and Mythological Stories
    « Reply #104 on: February 05, 2011, 03:53:50 PM »
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  • Guru Nanak Devji 
     
    Whenever there is decline of righteousness, whenever there is oppression and chaos in the land, whenever the faith of the people in God wanes, great men or saints appear from time to time to enrich sacred literature, to protect Dharma, to destroy unrighteousness and reawaken the love of God in the minds of the people. It was the time when Bharat (Indian continent) was invaded and ruled by foreign invaders. There was wholesale massacre everywhere; the kings were cruel and tyrannical and the people were cunning, selfish and greedy. There was religious persecution. The real spirit of dharma was crushed by ritualism. At such a time, Guru Nanank came to the world with a message of peace, unity, love and devotion to God. Nanak was born in 1469 in the Punjab province of Bharat (India). His father, Kalu, was an agriculturist and accountant of the village.
    Soon Nanak started going to school. But he was really not interested in gaining materialistic knowledge. His teacher, Gopal Pandha, insisted him to learn mathematics and accounts. He asked Gopal Pandha, “what is the extent of your knowledge? Does it help me to obtain salvation?” Gopal Pandha was struck with wonder. He could not give any satisfactory answer to Nanak’s question. But Nanak learnt mathematics and accounts anyway!

    Nanak would not chant anything without understanding it’s meaning. Once his sanskrit teacher, Pandit Brij Nath, asked him to write and chant – OM. Nanak asked him first, “Guruji! What is the meaning of OM? You did not teach me the meaning yet. How can I chant it if I don’t know the meaning?” Teacher Pandit Brij Nath was very astonished at his words and a also little angry. He himself did not know the meaning of OM. Then Nanak replied, “let me explain you the meaning” and he himself explained Pandit Brij Nath the meaning of OM.

    Nanak had a mystic disposition since childhood. He had a contemplative mind and a pious nature. One day, when Nanak was fifteen years of age, his father Kalu gave him twenty rupees (Indian currency) and said, “Nanak, go to the market and purchase some profitable commodity”. Kalu sent his servant Bala also to accompany Nanak. Nanak and Bala, while going to market, met a party of Sadhus (saints). Nanak thought: “Let me feed these Sadhus now. This is the most profitable bargain I can make”. He purchased provisions immediately and fed them sumptuously. Then he came back to his house. The servant Bala informed his master of his son’s bargain. Kalu was very much annoyed. He gave a slap on Nanak’s face. The father thought that Nanak did not like sedentary work. Therefore he said to Nanak, “O dear son! Ride on a horse and do traveling business. This will suit you nicely”. Nanak replied, “Revered father! My trade is divine knowledge. The profits are the purseful of good deeds with which I can certainly reach the domain of the Lord”. This event indicates Nanak’s divine nature and inclination towards God. Nanak began to spend his time in meditation and spiritual practices.

    Nanak got married to Sulakhani. He had two sons. Nanak discharged his duties very satisfactorily. He spent a small portion of his earnings for his own maintenance and distributed the rest to the poor. Even after the marriage, he continued practicing severe austerities and intense meditation. He used to go to the forest and lonely places for his meditation.

    Nanak became a public preacher at the age of thirty-four. He began to preach his mission through his songs and bhajans. When Nanak sang songs, his faithful servant Mardana used to accompany him on the rebeck. Nanak and his servant Mardana  wandered from place to place to carry  the message of peace and love for everybody. He preached the universal  brotherhood of man and the fatherhood of God to all  people. He asked people to  take God’s name with every breath. Nanak was a reformer too. He attacked the corruptions in society. He strongly protested against formalism and ritualism. He said, “Ritualism is not necessary while worshipping god”. His preaching produced a deep impression on the minds of the public. Soon people started calling him – Guru Nanak!.

    Guru Nanak’s songs are collected and preserved in the Granth Sahib or Adi Granth—the sacred book of the Sikh community. This book is in Gurumukhi language. Guru Nanak invented the Gurumukhi characters by simplifying the Sanskrit characters. The compositions of Guru Nanak are extensively described in this Granth Sahib Book. The Granth Sahib begins with the following: “There is but one God whose name is true— the Creator”. It contains a code of high morals. Purity of life, obedience to Guru, mercy, charity, temperance, justice, straightforwardness, truthfulness, sacrifice, service, love and abstinence from animal food are among the virtues on which great emphasis is laid; while lust, anger, pride, hatred, egoism, greed, selfishness, cruelty, backbiting and falsehood are vehemently condemned.

    Guru Nanak lived in this world for sixty nine years. He spent all his life in worshipping god and preaching people. Because of his rigorous meditation in order to realize God quickly, he became weak and sick. He felt that his time had come! He gave up food He became wholly absorbed in divine contemplation. He observed perfect silence and at the age of sixty nine, took his last breath.
     
     
    A Person, who has controlled his mind, can achieve any success in his life. How far you are trying to control your mind?
    The mind that judges not others ever remains tension-free.
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_lOgd1uS-wX0/TCOlFNMxIBI/AAAAAAAAE88/GpxUgxnwioE/why_fear_when_i_am_here.jpg

     


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