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Offline fatima

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Tips for Pregnant Women
« on: January 29, 2008, 02:53:15 AM »
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  • Pregnancy can be a stressful time for women, especially for their skin. Renowned health and well-being guru Miriam Stoppard offers her tips on keeping skin looking great during pregnancy


    Pregnancy hormones bring about huge changes to almost every part of a woman's body, from skin and hair right through to teeth and gums. To keep their pregnant bodies in top condition, mums-to-be need to adjust their daily skincare and pampering routine to ensure that they feel and look great, right up to their due date and beyond. Here are Miriam Stoppard's Top Tips for Pregnant Skincare:


    Check the suitability of your normal beauty products
    The first thing to do when you find you are pregnant is to check the products that you would normally use. You may find that some products are unsuitable for pregnant skin. If you are at all concerned then switch to products which state they are suitable for use during pregnancy

    Avoid using soap
    Soap removes natural oils from the skin, so try using a moisturising body wash instead. This will maintain the essential oils in pregnant skin and promote a healthy glow

    Don't spend too long in the bath
    Prolonged contact with water dehydrates the skin and can leave it looking dull. To avoid this use a moisturising bath soak to re-hydrate the skin

    Protect your skin
    Skin pigmentation can change during pregnancy and skin may tan/burn much more easily. Look for products with UV filters to help and make sure you pay special attention to your face and hands

    Feed your skin
    The turnover of skin cells is accelerated during pregnancy, so make sure you nourish and moisturise more than normal to keep skin looking healthy

    Get to grips with your bump
    Skin is under a lot of pressure during pregnancy especially in the abdominal area. Massaging your bump with a tummy massage gel will keep skin supple and elastic in areas prone to stretch marks

    Don't water it down
    After you wash, use a good moisturising body lotion to keep your skin in tip-top condition and to counteract the drying effect of water

    Take extra care of your face
    Some women find that their skin becomes oilier during pregnancy. Use a high-quality, pregnancy-safe, facial cleanser to help even things out

    Maintain your balance
    Try shower or bath products that contain extra moisturising properties and are pH balanced. These should help maintain a healthy glow for pregnant skin

    Start from the bottom up
    Feet can get tired and swollen in pregnancy. A refreshing foot gel with menthol will really pep you up at the end of a long day
    « Last Edit: January 29, 2008, 02:56:24 AM by fatima »
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    Re:Sleeping Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #1 on: January 29, 2008, 03:00:09 AM »
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  • Sleep is important to health of all people, but during pregnancy it is of utmost importance. During a women’s pregnancy, she needs to get plenty of extra rest. A growing fetus puts a lot of strain on a women’s body and she needs to get more sleep to re-fuel and keep going.

    Women are so tired because of the new hormones cycling through their bodies. Progesterone has a sleepy effect to it and makes women much more tired and want to sleep more or later. Each trimester has it’s own unique symptoms that can make sleep more difficult than when not pregnant. 1st Trimester

    During the first trimester, a woman can go through a range of emotions from scared to ecstatic. Adding the new hormones in the loop, and she can go from happy to horrible in record time. Sleep challenges are very common due to the body’s reaction to all the hormones.

    The rise in progesterone that sustains a pregnancy causes many women to feel tired continuously. The rise in HCG might also trigger the tired response too, which would explain why women tend to be more tired in the first trimester and feel much better in the second. Sore breasts and a blossoming bust line may also make getting comfortable difficult.

    If you are a tummy sleeper, you might find your breasts are getting in the way or hurt when you lay on them. Constipation and the ever-expanding uterus also make for discomforting nights. Add in frequent bathroom breaks per day and it is surprising that any pregnant woman sleeps at all.

     First TriProgesterone is just a wonder hormone, not only does it makes you sleepy; it makes you have to urinate all the time by increasing your kidney function. Nausea, also called “morning sickness”, also makes sleep a challenge. This nausea can and does strike at all hours of the day and night, especially when lying down or is triggered by smell. First mester Survival Tips

    1) Get as much rest as possible and sleep in when you can. Getting extra rest will help you stay out of the sleep debt that can cause your symptoms to worsen.

    2) Stay hydrated, but drink most of your liquids during the day and avoid them later in the evening so you can cut down on nighttime bathroom visits.

    3) Combat nausea with crackers or small bland snacks. Eat often and in small amounts to prevent getting sick from an empty tummy. Keep crackers at your beside for when nausea hits you in bed or in the morning.

    4) Sleep on your left side as much as you can. This is the best position for good circulation. Use extra pillows between your knees or under your belly to help keep you more comfortable.

    5) Have a night light in the bathroom so you don’t have to turn on the light and wake yourself fully.

    6) Make sure you try to go to bed at the same time every night. This puts your body on a schedule.

    7) Take naps. If you are tired then go sleep, you body is telling you to do something.

    2nd Trimester

    Many pregnant ladies are happy to hit that 2nd trimester mark. Not only does it mean there is a less risk of a miscarriage, but also the nausea, frequent urination, and sleepiness have pretty much gone away. Women usually feel their best and have a boost of energy during this time. They are starting to show, but aren’t too big for comfort.

    There are plenty of maladies to plague sleep during this time. To make room for the enlarging uterus, the diaphragm is restricted and breathing becomes shallower. This causes the infamous heartburn. Many women only have to eat or drink anything and get it.

    Many women notice their dreams become increasingly frightening as pregnancy develops. Many women have dreams that they left or lost the baby. Plus, dreams become extremely vivid.

    Second Trimester Survival Tips

    8) In order to avoid heartburn; try to avoid spicy, fatty, or fried foods

    9) Sleep with your head and neck elevated to keep the stomach acid down

    10) Eat frequent small meals throughout the day

    11) Use antacids, they are effective and safe.

    12) Enjoy your 2nd trimester and better sleep, but keep sleeping. Extra rest is still a good thing

    13) When sleeping, lie on your side with your knees and hips bent. Place pillows between your knees, under your tummy and behind your back. This can help take pressure off your lower back.

    14) To avoid nightmares try not to eat too much before bed and talk out any fears you might have with your partner or a therapist.

    3rd Trimester

    The third trimester is the most sleep challenged stage of pregnancy. With the frequency of urination, inability to get comfortable, extra weight, and preparing for the new baby, some women find themselves struggling to stay awake.

    Rigorous fetal movements and fetal hiccups can also impede sleep. Aches and pains of many kinds can be expected at this time. The joints are loosening and preparing for birth, the body is carrying all the extra weight, and even walking can be tough.

    Many women during pregnancy wake frequently during the night for no reason, which can cause her to be sleepy in the morning. Many women find that they have begun snoring. During the later stages of pregnancy, many women find that their nasal passages have swollen and have more nasal congestion. Many women complain of leg cramps during the 3rd trimester as well.

    The muscles of the legs are carrying a lot of weight and tend to get stiff. Once relaxed at night they can tense up or spasm, causing great pain and keeping some women awake.

    Third Trimester Survival Tips

    15) Sleep on your left side. This allows for the best blood flow to the fetus, your uterus and kidneys. It also improves circulation of blood back to the heart.

    16) Try using a body pillow to help you sleep better.

    17) Avoid sodas and other carbonated drinks, they can cause leg cramps.

    18) If you’re getting a lot of swelling and begin snoring, call you doctor

    19) If you develop Restless Legs Syndrome, talk to your doctor about an iron deficiency.

    20) If you can’t sleep get up and do something else. Read, watch T.V., listen to music, clean, you may get tired enough to want to go back to bed.

    21) If you are getting leg cramps, straighten your leg and flex your foot upwards, this will help get the kink out. Do these several times before going to bed as a stretching routine to avoid the cramps all together.
    « Last Edit: January 29, 2008, 03:05:31 AM by fatima »
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #2 on: January 29, 2008, 03:03:52 AM »
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  • Skin Care Tips for Pregnancy !!!


    Pregnancy can be nine of the most exciting months of a woman's life. But, as anyone who is or has been pregnant knows, it can also feel like you spend the better part of those months learning what you can and cannot eat, breathe, and touch! Hopefully I can at least take some of the guesswork out of the skin care realm.

    Consider these do and don'ts:

    • Stop using retinoids (like Retin-A, Tazorac, or Differin, for example) and over-the-counter products with retinol. They are in the same family as Accutane, which you may already have been told to avoid.

    • Salicylic acid is also not suitable for pregnant women, but can be safely substituted with lactic or glycolic acid, which work similarly. Remember, salicylic acid is a common ingredient in chemical peels as well as skin care products. MD Forte Cleanser III is a good option.

    • It can be easy to equate "natural" with "harmless," but remember that certain supplements and herbs may also be unsuitable for pregnant women. The safety of many of them has not been studied in pregnant women. If you're taking any, discuss them with your doctor.

    • Switch to physical (a.k.a. mineral) sunscreens, which remain on the surface of your skin and aren't absorbed into your system. (Physical sunscreens typically contain titanium dioxide and zinc oxide.) I love the Blue Lizard Suncream from Australia, which is available in many major U.S. chains.

    • Many pregnant women experience acne, or increased acne, during pregnancy, as fluctuating hormones cause oil production to increase. But don't worry if your skin still seems altered post-pregnancy - it can take a few months for hormones to return to their pre-pregnancy normal, especially if you're breast-feeding. Ask your doctor to recommend a safe product to treat breakouts, and avoid self-treating with products you're not sure about (as many acne treatments contain salicylic acid and retinol).

    • Pregnancy is associated with a form of hyperpigmentation called melasma - it's so common, in fact, that melasma is often called "the mask of pregnancy." Over-the-counter skin-lightening products with hydroquinone are safe, but many pregnant women prefer to avoid that ingredient (and the FDA is considering a ban, which might make it unavailable anyway!). I recommend DDF Intensive Holistic Lightener as a great hydroquinone-free option.

    • Concerned about stretch marks? Moisturize three to four times a day with cocoa butter, shea butter, or almond/safflower oil. (Just on the tummy, though - those ingredients are too heavy for pregnant women's acne-prone facial skin.)

    Pregnant women may develop a biotin deficiency which can lead to brittle nails. Discuss taking these supplements with your doctor. The daily U.S. Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) is 400 micrograms for adults, 500 micrograms for breastfeeding adult women, and 600 micrograms per day for pregnant adult women.
    Wishing you great skin!

    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline mirasiv

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #3 on: January 29, 2008, 06:57:20 AM »
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  • Dear Fatimaji,

    jai Sairam

    Thanks for posting useful tips to be considered during pregnancy.

    Jai Saima

    Offline fatima

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #4 on: January 30, 2008, 01:08:56 AM »
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  • Does a pregnant woman need to eat twice as much?

    It has often been said that a pregnant woman should eat for two people, but this is not true.

    What is true is that during pregnancy a woman has to provide good nutrition for two individuals. The growing baby gets all its nourishment from its mother through the umbilical cord, so diet is very important. If the mother is lacking in any vitamins and nutrients her baby might lack them too.

    If a woman has had trouble keeping her weight up or down before the pregnancy, she should make a nutritional plan with the help of her doctor or midwife.


    How much energy does a woman need during pregnancy?

    A woman who is not pregnant needs approximately 2100 calories per day.


    A pregnant woman needs approximately 2500 calories per day.


    A breastfeeding woman needs approximately 3000 calories per day.


    Calories are sometimes called Kilocalories or KCals. [/b]


    What other vitamins and minerals are essential during pregnancy?

    Folic acid

    During the first three months of pregnancy (and preferably before becoming pregnant) a woman needs folic acid. This is one of the B-group vitamins and is also known as vitamin B9. It is important during pregnancy for the creation of the baby's nervous system.

    Folic acid can help prevent neural tube defects such as spina bifida and other congenital malformations such as cleft palate or cleft lip.

    Good natural sources of folic acid are barley beans, fruit, green vegetables, orange juice, lentils, peas and rice. It is recommended that all pregnant women take a daily 400 microgram supplement of folic acid a day for two months before conception and three months into their pregnancy.

    The dosage of the supplement should be larger - 5mg per day - if a woman has previously given birth to a child with a neural tube defect or if she or partner has spina bifida. She should discuss this matter with her doctor.

    Iron
    During pregnancy, a woman's body needs more iron than usual to produce all the blood needed to supply nutrition to the placenta. Good sources of iron are green vegetables such as broccoli and spinach, strawberries, muesli and wholemeal bread.

    Iron is more easily absorbed if it is taken in conjunction with vitamin C - either as a supplement or in citrus fruit or juice. Tea and coffee can interfere with the body's absorption of iron.

    It is often recommended that all pregnant women take an iron supplement every day from the 20th week of pregnancy. This is not necessary if a woman has a good diet and routine blood tests show that she is not anaemic. Iron supplements may cause constipation.

    [b]Zinc and calcium

    The minerals zinc and calcium are also needed for the development of the embryo. However, it is usually possible to obtain enough zinc and calcium by following a varied diet.

    What foods should be avoided during pregnancy?

    It is important to avoid vitamin A during pregnancy because it may cause damage to the embryo. Foods containing large amounts of vitamin A include liver, and should be eaten on an occasional basis only. Unpasteurised cheeses, blue-veined cheeses and pâté are also not recommended because of the possible risk of transmission of infectious diseases such as Listeria.

    How to avoid constipation [/color]

    Constipation during pregnancy can be caused by hormonal changes that cause the intestines to move less. Iron supplements can also cause constipation.

    To avoid constipation, eat lots of fibre-rich foods such as fruit, vegetables, wholemeal bread and cereal, prunes and prune juice. Drinking 2 to 3 litres of water each day will also help prevent constipation by keeping stools moist.

    Regular exercise will also help get the intestines moving. About 20 to 30 minutes' swimming or brisk walking two to three times a week is a good level of exercise to aim for.

    A pharmacist will be able to provide advice about over-the-counter preparations that are safe to use during pregnancy to relieve constipation.


    [color=maroon]How much weight should a woman gain during pregnancy?
    [/b]


    It is considered normal to gain 10 to 12kg (22 to 26lb).

    For practical reasons the pregnancy is divided into three periods:


    the first period runs from week 0 to 12 where it is normal to gain 1 to 2kg (2 to 4lb).


    the second period runs from weeks 12 to 28 in which it is normal to gain 300 to 400g (10 to 14oz) a week.


    the third period runs from weeks 28 to 40 and it is normal to gain 1 to 3kg (2 to 6lb) a month.


    It is not necessary to be obsessive about your weight during pregnancy. Many obstetricians have stopped weighing women other than at their first visit because the information is of little use in detecting problems with the mother or her baby.

    However, excess weight gain is probably best avoided since most women will want to return to the same dress size within a few months of delivery


    [color=maroon]Where do the extra kilos come from? [/b] [/b]


    A total weight increase of about 11.2kg (24lb) is normal.


    A baby weighs approximately 3.5kg (7lb 11oz) before birth.


    The uterus grows to approximately 900g (1lb 14oz).


    The placenta weighs approximately 650g (1lb 6oz).


    The amniotic fluid weighs approximately 800g (1lb 12oz).


    The woman's breasts grow by approximately 400g (14oz).


    The weight of the extra blood is approximately 1.25kg (2lb 12oz).


    Water retained in the body tissues weighs approximately 2kg (4lb 6oz).


    The layer of fat beneath the skin weighs approximately 1.7kg (3lb 11oz).
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    What Should not you eat during pregnancy??
    « Reply #5 on: January 30, 2008, 01:36:53 AM »
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  • We are far more aware of potential harmful effects of various foods than we ever have been before. It is worth remembering that the diseases that can be caught by eating 'unsafe' foods are rare, but where possible it is certainly sensible to reduce the risks as far as reasonably possible.Current recommendations are to avoid;

    Pates and soft ripened cheeses such as brie, camembert and blue-veined varieties. These foods may contain Listeria, a strain of bacteria which can have harmful effects on the baby.

    Eggs may contain Salmonella, which can cause diarrhoea and vomiting. During pregnancy it is wise to cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are solid. Remember that mayonnaise and mousses may contain raw eggs.

    Be very careful about food preparation, especially the handling of raw meat and poultry. These products may contain Toxoplasma, a bacterium that can cause miscarriage and harm the baby.


    [Toxoplasma can also be caught from contact with cat faeces. Having a cat is not a problem, but someone other than the pregnant woman should remove the soiled litter within 24 hours. You should be careful about washing your hands when you have been handling the cat. See our factsheet on 'Pets, pregnancy and your baby'.

    Other foods that are best avoided include;

    Untreated milk

    Shellfish such as oysters and mussels that may be contaminated with harmful bacteria and viruses.

    Any food that has passed it's 'use by' date.

    Peanuts are best avoided in pregnancy, as there is now some suggestion that in susceptible women, eating peanuts while pregnant may be linked to peanut allergy in children, and also to an increased risk of asthma and eczema.

    Liver and liver products should be avoided as they contain high levels of vitamin A, which is now thought to have harmful effects on the baby.Although this list probably seems long, most foods are perfectly safe in pregnancy.

    Try to eat a balanced diet with a variety of bread, cereals, fruit vegetables, dairy foods, meat, fish, eggs, and pulses. [/b]
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #6 on: February 01, 2008, 01:46:56 AM »
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  • Travel Tips for Pregnant Women: Wearing Comfortable Shoes and Other Advice

    Traveling is almost always safe during pregnancy. Unless you are having unique complications, most doctors allow their patients to travel and fly until they are 34-36 weeks pregnant, at which point the risk of premature labor becomes a common concern. While traveling during pregnancy is generally a great way to relax and relieve some of the stress of preparing for a new addition, it's always a good idea to discuss your travel plans with your doctor or midwife ahead of time. If he or she approves your plan, you're in for a real treat. Traveling while pregnant can be a lot of fun and can be relatively easy - if you make the right choices and go the right places.

    Travel tip 1# Plan the pregant card

    Many women are nervous about being labeled as pregnant women who can't "do anything," but while flying, making a big deal out of your pregnancy has its perks. By letting the attendants know that you are pregnant and by speaking with them before boarding, you can make sure that you have an aisle seat ("I have to go to the bathroom a lot"), and you also have the option of pre-boarding the flight. Pre-boarding is a great advantage because it gives you time to sit down and get settling in without having to stand for long periods of time waiting to get on the plane.

    Travel Tip #2: Wear good shoes.

    Even if you have your entire trip planned out, wearing good shoes is a "must" for all pregnant travelers. Whether you're 6 weeks along or 36, good shoes will give your feet and back the support that they need to keep you energized and alert. Chances are, you're probably easily exhausted, so the extra energy your body gains from good support is necessary in ensuring you have a great vacation.


    Travel Tip #3: Don't overdo it.


    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #7 on: February 01, 2008, 01:55:25 AM »
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  • What Happens in Each Stage of Pregnancy?

    1st Trimester (Week1 to the end of Week 12)

    Congratulations! Your journey to motherhood is underway. Check out the changes in your body and how your baby grows during the first three months.

    2nd Trimester (Week13 to the end of Week 26)

    You're adjusting to the precious life inside you. Learn what to expect in the second trimester

    3nd Trimester (Week 27 to the end of pregnacy)

    You're in the home stretch! Start thinking about breastfeeding, learn to spot the signs of labor and get the facts on cesarean sections
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #8 on: February 02, 2008, 05:57:39 AM »
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  • Back Pain Relief Tips For Pregnant Women

    Back pain is one of the banes that generally go with pregnancy. It is a common complaint. More than 50 % of the pregnant woman population suffers from it.

    Back pain during the pregnancy is mainly due to change in the contours of the body of the woman, as baby grows within and puts on additional weight, month after month to the mother. This extra weight causes a change in the center of gravity of the woman's body. Major hormonal changes are also noticed in the early stages of the pregnancy, which is an additional cause of the back pain.

    The center of gravity of women's body shifts forward with the growth of the uterus. Her postures and movement style change and this put additional strain on her back, resulting in backache.

    In certain cases, urinary infections which are also common during the pregnancy can be the cause of back pain. If the woman has acute back pain during the early stages of pregnancy, the same requires immediate attention of the doctor. Back pain during the pregnancy can be due to a multiplicity of factors which demands immediate attention.

    Medication for the sake of medication should be avoided during pregnancy. You are responsible for two lives, so any medication will only be by the advice of the doctor. Exercising is the sure remedy for a pregnant woman. Simple walking is the best exercise. But do not do aggressive walking.

    Avoid slouching. Maintain an appropriate posture by using a lumber cushion or pillow. Cultivate by experience good body mechanics. Muscular exercises are a deterrent to back pain.

    A pregnant woman is not expected to stand for long periods, say while traveling and for any other reasons. Do not change your sitting position too often. In the early stages of pregnancy proper rest and adequate sleep is necessary. Avoid high-heeled shoes at all costs. The practice is dangerous as it will put lots of strain on the back. Use a low flat stool for sitting. Avoid kitchen work for longer durations.

    Your clothing should also be imaginative. Avoid tight clothing. Even if you are tired, avoid slumping forward. Slumping pushes the rib cage forward and down to the stomach. You can well imagine the resultant problems. While standing, be comfortable and keep your knees soft.

    Many of your experienced friends and relatives can give you the correct tips for your backache problem. Such tips at times are more useful than the medical advice you get from your family doctor.

     
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #9 on: February 02, 2008, 06:06:21 AM »
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  • Prenatal Training - exercise tips for pregnant women

    Exercise tips for each trimester of pregnancy
    Although pregnancy is a wonderful experience for women, it can also be a concerning time for those who lead active lifestyles. These women often feel restrained because they worry about not being able to continue their exercise regimens. In order to assist women dealing with these issues, the following exercise tips are recommended for each trimester of pregnancy.

    Trimester I
    If your pregnancy is going smoothly, you are not physically limited--unless you participate in a strenuous sport like fencing, kickboxing or a contact sport, such as soccer. If this is the case, consult your doctor before continuing the sport.
    * Any workout activities, like running and weightlifting, are fine.
    * Be extra careful when stretching! During pregnancy, there's an increase in the hormone relaxin, which results in looser joints throughout pregnancy and for several months after giving birth. Since pregnant women may feel more limber, they often over-stretch and injure themselves.

    Trimester II
    The second trimester is the ideal time to shift from aerobic workouts to mind and body exercise, as it will help prepare your mental flow and focus for your soon-to-arrive baby.

    * A prenatal yoga class.

    * Alter your sit-ups! Sit-ups are okay if done on a 45-degree incline with knees bent.

    * Weights are still okay, as long as they are not too strenuous.

    * The exercise bike is great because it is a non-weight bearing and aerobic exercise
    * It is important not to overheat your body. To prevent overheating, pace yourself and rest as needed during your workout. Make sure to drink plenty of extra water; remember, you're drinking for two now!


    Trimester III
    In the third trimester, your activities should be limited to your level of comfort.

    * Daily walks.

    * Swimming is the best exercise for the third trimester because it is aerobic and safe to do everyday. Also, floating gives you a "weightless" sensation, which can be a welcome relief from the constraints of your growing belly.

    * Here again, prenatal yoga is a wonderful way to prepare your body, mind and spirit for your soon- to-arrive baby.

    These exercises are designed for physically active women. For women who are not physically active, a loose regimen of daily walks, stretching or prenatal yoga is recommended.
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #10 on: February 12, 2008, 01:48:58 AM »
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  • Diabetes and Pregnancy

    Most major organ systems are formed in the growing fetus during the first seven weeks after conception. This phase -- when some women do not know that they are pregnant -- is widely considered the most critical time of development in the entire human lifespan. The early weeks of pregnancy are especially critical for women with diabetes.
    The extra precautions described here mainly apply to women with diabetes who become pregnant, rather than women who develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. During pregnancy, gestational diabetes does not carry the same risk of maternal complications as type 1 or type 2 diabetes.


    How Should Women With Diabetes Prepare for Pregnancy?


    Women with diabetes should have a complete physical examination before becoming pregnant. As part of the examination, they should provide their doctors with a complete medical history, including duration and type of diabetes, medications and supplements taken, and any history of diabetic complications, such as neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy and cardiac problems.
    It is also important for women with diabetes to plan ahead and maintain excellent blood sugar control before conceiving, as high blood sugar levels during the first trimester can lead to miscarriage or congenital anomalies, which are abnormal changes during fetal development in the uterus.

    Before becoming pregnant, women with diabetes should also have their kidney function tested.

    Although pregnancy does not worsen diabetic nephropathy (kidney disease), pregnant women with advanced kidney disease are more prone to high blood pressure, which can affect nearly all body systems and ultimately endanger the fetus.

    Why Is Managing Blood Sugar Especially Important for Pregnant Women With Diabetes?

    In a 1989 study, women with a prepregnancy A1C value (a blood test that measures glucose levels) that was greater than 9.3% had the highest risk of miscarriages and birth to babies born with congenital anomalies. Studies have indicated that A1C values of up to 6% (with 5% being considered normal) carry the same risk of miscarriage and fetal anomalies as a nondiabetic pregnancy.
    Women with higher than normal blood sugar levels, whether they have gestational, type 1 or type 2 diabetes, also tend to have larger babies. This leads to a greater risk of injuries of the shoulder and brachial plexus (the nerves connecting the spine with the arm and shoulder) to the infant during childbirth.

    Poorly controlled diabetes is also associated with pre-eclampsia (high blood pressure) and premature delivery.

    There is very little information about the effect of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) on long-term development of the fetus.


    Are There Diabetes Medications That Should be Avoided During Pregnancy?

    Women with type 2 diabetes who take oral medications for blood sugar control should switch to using insulin before becoming pregnant and throughout pregnancy. While some oral antidiabetic medications have been studied and were found to be safe in pregnancy, insulin is the best and safest method for controlling blood sugar throughout pregnancy.
    Many blood pressure medications can be dangerous for the fetus; therefore, usually these medications should be stopped before pregnancy if blood pressure can be maintained below 130/80 mmHg with dietary salt control alone. If blood pressure medications are absolutely necessary, women may have to be switched to a new medication prior to pregnancy. In particular, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are excellent for blood pressure control in nonpregnant women with diabetes; however, these are not safe when used by a woman who is diabetic and pregnant.

    Similarly, cholesterol-lowering medications should also be stopped during pregnancy.

    How are Diet and Exercise Managed for Pregnant Women With Diabetes?


    Nutrition is vitally important for pregnant women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In general, pregnant and nursing women with diabetes should ingest 15 to 17 calories per pound of body weight daily, although this may vary from person to person and should be discussed with the diabetes care team before, during, and after pregnancy and nursing.
    Important nutritional concerns in type 1 diabetes include consistent day-to-day food intake and consumption of a bedtime snack, and adjusting insulin according to activity and food content to prevent high or low blood sugar levels to carefully treat hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, respectively.

    Nutrition is the most important means of blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes. Pregnant women with type 2 diabetes should talk with their diabetes care providers, and ideally a diabetes nutritionist, to determine their goals for daily calories, carbohydrates, nutritional balance in foods, and timing of eating throughout the day.

    Exercise is beneficial for pregnant women with type 2 diabetes, as it helps improve the body’s response to insulin. Women with type 1 diabetes who exercised prior to pregnancy can probably continue to exercise during pregnancy. However, women with type 1 diabetes who are not accustomed to exercise are more prone to hypoglycemia with exercise during pregnancy; for this reason, these women are not advised to begin an exercise regimen when pregnant.
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #11 on: February 14, 2008, 04:00:47 AM »
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  • Here are a few other general health tips and advice. Of course, it's important to discuss all questions and concerns with your health care provider.

    Some medications (prescription and over-the-counter) that are generally safe could harm your growing baby. Talk to your health care provider about medications you're currently taking. If you get sick, check to make sure any drugs you take are safe for pregnant women.

    Eat right. To help your baby grow strong and healthy, eat lots of fruits and veggies, whole grains, and calcium-rich foods. Avoid saturated fats and limit your caffeine intake. Remember: you're eating for two now, make sure you both get the best!

    Take your vitamins!
    Making sure you and your baby get all the necessary nutrients is extremely important, especially at the start of your pregnancy. Buy prenatal vitamins with folic acid at your local drugstore and remember to take one everyday.

    Think ahead about what you'll need once the baby's born, and take note of helpful resources in your community

    Quit your bad habits. If you smoke, drink, or use other drugs, please talk to care provider about quitting. Don't hesitate to ask for help, as these habits are extremely dangerous to your baby n your health.

    Unless your doctor tells you not to, try to exercise for at least 30 minutes a day. You will feel better throughout your pregnancy, and labor might even be easier if you're in better shape.
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #12 on: February 15, 2008, 04:34:40 AM »
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  • Techniques for coping with stress during pregancy!

    Gaining control of your life:

    1. Take a close look at your lifestyle. Make yourself do this on paper. Look at your work activities, home and family responsibilities, other obligations (church, community activities, clubs and organizations to which you belong). Then look to see how "doable" it is. Make sure you include in your calculations time for yourself for such activities as exercise, down time, and socializing Once you have done this, be honest with yourself as you ask the following: Is this schedule achievable? Sustainable? Satisfying? If not, accept the reality that you have to change the schedule.

    2. Accept the fact that even if you currently can thrive on your busy and demanding lifestyle, you likely will not be able to sustain it as pregnancy progresses and makes more physical demands on you. Therefore prepare yourself to cut back on what you're doing and to allow yourself more time for rest and relaxation. You will need to sleep more. You will need to change the time you a lot for meals to make sure that you are able to eat a balanced diet. You will feel better if you allow time to engage in a reasonable exercise program. Finally you will need to allow yourself some "mental growth" time. This is time for reading, thinking, and planning for the new, incredibly important role of mother you will soon assume.

    3. Be prepared to give up some control over the life-style you have worked so hard to attain. Many things about pregnancy are not in your control. You may experience severe morning sickness. You may have overwhelming fatigue. You may develop a pregnancy complication requiring hospitalization or home bed rest. For many women, especially those who have demanding jobs, the thought that biology might interfere with their responsibilities borders on the intolerable. But it happens. Be prepared to accept this.


    4. Make up your mind that you, and not your husband or your mother or your boss or your friends, are going to determine how you feel about your pregnancy and how you cope with it. Other than your medical care providers, you are the best person to determine what your needs are, how hard you should work, how much you should rest, what you should eat, and all other aspects of your behavior during pregnancy. Certainly listen to the advice of both medical professionals and friends and family members that you trust. But don't allow yourself to be made to feel bad by the well-intentioned but often incorrect comments and claims of others.
    5. Keep lines of communication open with those you love, especially your spouse. Your spouse, parents, and friends--unless they are currently pregnant themselves--will not know exactly what you are experiencing and cannot anticipate what your wants and needs will be. Let them know. Tell them how you are feeling and how they can help. At the same time you must also be sensitive to the concerns and anxieties your spouse might have, especially if this is your first pregnancy.

    6. Don't be a hero. This is especially important if your work environment is in a traditionally "macho" field. Such professions as law, medicine, and corporate life often make demands that are simply impossible for a pregnant woman to fulfill if they are to remain in good health and reasonably sane. Discuss with your spouse and your boss what you can and cannot reasonably do and make adjustments accordingly. Your employer certainly wants you to work as long as you can into your pregnancy. By adjusting your work environment in minor ways you often will be able to contribute much more to your organization than by following your former rigid schedule.

    7. Do your homework. Learn as much about pregnancy as you can. Read, talk to friends, attend classes, and talk to your doctor or midwife to learn as much as possible not only about the biology of pregnancy but about its emotional implications as well. In this way if you do begin to experience new and disturbing emotions you'll at least not be surprised by them.

    8. Give yourself permission to relax. This means making time specifically for relaxation and not doing so only when the odd spare moment occurs. Take time to do whatever makes you feel good. Read a book, see a movie, have a massage, sleep in late when you can. Each of us has his or her own means of personal "profit-taking". Make sure you do some, do your best to enjoy it, and by no means allow yourself to feel guilty about it.


    9. Teach yourself--or get taught--relaxation techniques. It has been shown by many researchers, notably Herbert Benson, M.D. and Alice Domar, PhD., that by learning to elicit a state of deep physical rest on command, both your body and your mind return to a calm, relaxed state. Heart rate, blood pressure, stress hormone levels, and muscle tension will drop. The mind experiences a marked diminution in tension and the perception of stress. This is called the Relaxation Response. Techniques for eliciting the response can be learned from health care providers or by reading the excellent description of it in Dr. Alice Domar, Self Nurture.
    10. Talk to yourself--and write it down. The process of specifically identifying thoughts and feelings and putting them into written form is an excellent way both to come to grips with what you are experiencing and to help resolve any of these feelings that are troublesome. Doing so will give you better insight into yourself and will often relieve the pain of previously disturbing thoughts or feelings.

    11. Test the origins of your emotions for validity. This process is called "cognitive restructuring". All of us get feedback and messages from those with whom we deal in the world. Often we make negative assumptions about ourselves based on this feedback and thus feel badly about interactions we have had and about ourselves. This process of negative thinking occurs spontaneously and can often be overwhelming. But if you can begin to identify these repetitive negative thoughts and write them down to make sure you have a clear understanding of them, you can then begin the process of seeing what triggers them and determine whether your thought or the emotion it evokes is reasonable. Whenever you get one of these thoughts look to see what caused it. Ask yourself if what happened-a comment, a cool look, etc-- deserves the negative response you have given it. By so doing you can start to break the cycle of automatic negative feelings sparked by common events in your life.

    12. Finally, and not at all the least important, consider the possibility of obtaining professional help. The field of psychopharmacology has advanced so much over the last 15 years that seeing a therapist no longer automatically involves years of once a week visits to talk about your feelings. Although such "talk therapy" can be helpful, there are now many medications that are safe for pregnant women to take. These medicines have very few side effects yet can transform how you feel. Depressed moods are often caused by changes in the biochemistry of the brain. There are medicines that can safely adjust the levels of brain chemicals. These medicines, just like the insulin the diabetic takes, can correct abnormal biochemistry and make you feel better and happier. If you and your health are provider decide that such medications would be useful for you, by all means try them. They will not cause a miscarriage or harm your baby.


    Conclusion:

    Life is complex and often hard. Stress will not be going away anytime soon. There are, however, ways that you as a pregnant woman can go about evaluating the stress you are under and make changes in your life to better be able to deal with it. By so doing, you'll have a healthier pregnancy and be a happier person.
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #13 on: February 15, 2008, 04:38:52 AM »
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  • Morning Sickness

    Morning sickness can be an unpleasant period during pregnancy. Many pregnant women (about 70 to 85%) experience a period of nausea and vomiting. Others will experience some of the nauseating symptoms of morning sickness. While the likelihood of getting ill may be due to genetics and hormones for some, morning sickness can be related to liver toxicity, low blood sugar or insufficient B vitamins, such as B6 and folic acid. The good news about this is that over 50% of sufferers will feel better by the 12th week of pregnancy, and over 90% have stopped vomiting by the end of the fourth month.  

    Here are some ways to curb it:

    Supplement your diet with nutritional whole grains, wheat germ and spirulina can help. Drinking ginger tea or a glass of water with a squeeze of fresh lemon can take the edge off nausea.
     

    As well, here are some suggestions that many women have found to help:

    try snacking or "grazing" throughout the day instead of eating large meals
    avoid rich and fatty foods - try plain carbohydrates like potatoes and rice
    try soups, jelly, colas and other sodas, and sugared herbal teas
    carry salted crackers or some similar food around - it's important not to let the stomach get completely empty, as this can increase nausea
    try to avoid things that trigger nausea, like certain food smells
    if taking prenatal vitamins containing iron, try switching brands to see if symptoms grow milder
    avoid prenatal vitamins and take folic acid only
    avoid cooking
    avoid acidic foods
    avoid fried foods
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

    Offline fatima

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    • Blessings 16
    Re: Tips for Pregnant Women
    « Reply #14 on: February 16, 2008, 04:02:10 AM »
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  • Strategies to Ease Heartburn Symptoms during Pregnancy


     Pregnant women can treat and relieve their heartburn symptoms through lifestyle and dietary changes. The following tips can help reduce heartburn discomfort:

    1.Avoid eating late at night or before retiring to bed. Common heartburn triggers include greasy or spicy food, chocolate, peppermint, tomato sauces, caffeine, carbonated drinks, and citrus fruits.
    Wear loose-fitting clothes. Clothes that fit tightly around your waist put pressure on your abdomen and the lower esophageal sphincter.

    2.Eat smaller meals. Overfilling the stomach can result in acid reflux and heartburn.
    Don’t lie down after eating. Wait at least 3 hours after eating before going to bed. When you lie down, it’s easier for stomach contents (including acid) to back up into the esophagus, particularly when you go to bed with a full stomach.

    3.Raise the head of the bed 4 to 6 inches. This can help reduce acid reflux by decreasing the amount of gastric contents that reach the lower esophagus.
    Avoid tobacco and alcohol. Abstinence from alcohol and smoking can help reduce reflux symptoms and avoid fetal exposure to potentially harmful substances
    Not every heart is capable of finding the secret of God's love.

    There are not pearls in every sea; there is not gold in every mine.


                                       ------Baba Farid

     


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